Life issues

In Plain Sight

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Josh has called the underbelly of a highway overpass his home on and off for the past four years.

Photos he took recently show what life looks like underneath the overpass. Sleeping bags, a few chairs and some tents provide refuge from the elements. His favorite photos include his "family" — homeless friends who share the space with him in St. Charles County

Gov. Greitens calls for special session to address life issues

Sister Elsy Chencheril is a Salesian Missionaries of Mary Immaculate who volunteers at Our Lady’s Inn to watch children while their mothers are in classes. A special legislative session called by Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens will, among other items, consider pro-life legislation related to protections for pregnancy resource centers such as Our Lady’s Inn.

Missouri lawmakers convened for a special session June 12 to consider pro-life legislation related to protections for pregnancy resource centers and proposals for health and safety standards in abortion clinics, among other issues.

Editorial | Climate agreement or not, we are called to act

Don't be discouraged.

President Donald J. Trump's announcement June 1 that the United States will not honor the Paris agreement on climate doesn't change on our obligation to take care of the earth.

The United States and China, the two largest carbon emitters, and 195 other nations signed the agreement that was ratified in November 2016. The Paris agreement establishes that nations must reduce their carbon dioxide emissions in order to keep global temperatures well-below a 2-degree Celsius increase in relation to pre-industrial levels.

Taking the culture of death to court

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke with Frank O'Brien of O'Brien Industrial Holdings, LLC, on the steps of the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse.

History is repeating itself for Frank O'Brien.

Several years ago, the Catholic business owner filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, challenging a mandate that required most employers to purchase health insurance for their employees, including coverage for contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs.

Wrongful convictions: From death row to freedom

Reggie Griffin, a Missouri death row exoneree, told the crowd about his story on May 20 at an event at the St. Louis Galleria Lush store. Griffin along with fellow exoneree, Joe Amrine, were both convicted of murders they did not commit and spent years on death row before being exonerated.

Joe Amrine selected the music for his funeral service.

He wasn't sick, nor was he elderly. He was on Missouri's death row awaiting lethal injection.

In November 2001, Missouri Attorney General Jay Nixon asked the Missouri Supreme Court to set an execution date for Amrine and nine other men on death row. The court complied in six cases, but delayed in Amrine's case. By then a groundswell of support built for his exoneration in part because of a documentary, "Unreasonable Doubt: the Joe Amrine Case," by a group of university graduate students.

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