lent

DEAR FATHER | Station churches are part of ancient Lenten tradition

The station (or stational) churches are specific churches in the city of Rome that are designated to be visited by the pope or his delegate on a particular day of the Lenten season.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Our Lenten journey requires pardon and healing

According to this week's readings, we have sinned. What we deserve is punishment. What God offers, instead, is mercy and compassion.

But what are the qualities of mercy and compassion? When we hope for them what exactly are we hoping for? The more we know that, the more we'll know what our Lenten journey is about.

Certainly, we hope for forgiveness. As the Psalm for Monday pleads: "Lord, do not deal with us according to our sins." But do we hope that God will forgive us without changing us?

Marianist group at St. Mary’s tackles racial justice topic

The topic of racial justice is one that a group focused on Marian spirituality might have been inclined to skip.

But Mary led them to it, and the result is a Lenten program being held at St. Mary's High School on Wednesday evenings with a theme of "With Mary Toward Racial Justice." The weekly presentations on Marian spirituality and racial justice are open to the public.

More than just fried cod | Lenten Fridays offer variety of dinner options beyond the standard fare

Seminarians cook their catch at Ryan Lake in Lent of 1916.

Editor's note: Updated Friday, March 3, at 10 a.m. with clarification on dispensation.

It's late afternoon on a Friday in Lent, and you're famished.

It's almost dinner time, so where do you go and what do you eat to satisfy the Lenten abstinence from meat for dinner?

The first option, of course, is a fish fry at either your parish or another in the Archdiocese of St. Louis. (Check out the St. Louis Review's map of parish fish fries to find one of the many from which to choose.)

Video series offers Gospel guidance for the Lenten journey

Father Aktham Hijazin distributed ashes at a Mass Ash Wednesday at Annunciation Church in Beit Jala, West Bank.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — One of the biggest challenges of Lent, for many people who are caught up in the demands of everyday life, is to set aside meaningful time during the penitent season to forge a deeper connection with Christ.

"Despite our busy-ness, we need to find a way to pay attention to God" during Lent, said Father Ed Steiner, rector of the Cathedral of the Incarnation in Nashville.

THE CATHOLIC DIFFERENCE | A Lent to remember

The best Lent of my life involved getting up every day at 5:30 a.m., hiking for miles through ankle-twisting, cobblestoned city streets, dodging drivers for whom traffic laws were traffic suggestions, avoiding the chaos of transit strikes and other civic disturbances and battling bureaucracies civil and ecclesiastical — all while 3,500 miles from home sweet home.

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