lcwr

Editorial | Encourage, engage and pray our way to more women religious.

St. Louis is losing an important ministry. On Aug. 24, the Little Sisters of the Poor announced they are leaving St. Louis after almost 150 years of serving the poor elderly. The reason? Too few sisters.

We've heard this before. Generations ago, many Catholic schools were run by a sister. Catholic health care ministries were run by religious, not corporations.

Women religious at assembly urged to face crisis with contemplation

Sister Marcia Allen, a Sister of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas, and president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, delivers her address Aug. 10 to attendees at the LCWR assembly in Atlanta.

ATLANTA — About 800 members of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious gathered in Atlanta for their annual assembly Aug. 9-12.

With the theme of "Embracing the Mystery: Living Transformation," the sisters considered where God is moving in today's world as they face smaller and graying communities.

"The whole assembly is about listening to the movements of God, not only individually, but collectively," said Sister Annmarie Sanders, a member of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, who is LCWR's communications director.

LCWR leaders hope Vatican will resolve issues, honor group's integrity

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Members of the national board of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious said their "deepest hope" is to resolve the issues between them and the Vatican doctrinal congregation in a way that honors LCWR's mission and integrity.

The board issued the statement after the close of LCWR's annual assembly Aug. 12-15 in Nashville.

'Blunt' cardinal rebukes LCWR

VATICAN CITY -- Using what he acknowledged was unusually "blunt" language, the head of the Vatican's doctrinal office rebuked officers of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious for honoring a Catholic theologian whose work was judged "seriously inadequate" and for promoting futuristic ideas he described as "opposed to Christian revelation."

LCWR leader hopes assembly a contemplative experience for attendees

ORLANDO, Fla. -- The president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious said organizers of this year's assembly hope attendees would find it to be a contemplative experience because "it is imperative to view religious life within the context of our faith and in an evolving world."

"We have included an hour and a half of contemplative prayer at all meetings to determine what the signs of today are calling us to and we hope that the entire experience of this assembly will be an act of contemplation," said Franciscan Sister Florence Deacon.

LCWR leader hopes assembly a contemplative experience for attendees

Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States, and Seattle Archbishop J. Peter Sartain concelebrate Mass Aug. 14 during the Leadership Conference of Women Religious assembly in Orlando, Fla. The annual gathering brings together members of a majority of the women's religious congregations in the U.S.

 

 

ORLANDO, Fla. -- The president of the Leadership Conference of
Women Religious said organizers of this year's assembly hope attendees
would find it to be a contemplative experience because "it is imperative
to view religious life within the context of our faith and in an
evolving world."

"We have included an hour and a half of contemplative prayer at all
meetings to determine what the signs of today are calling us to and we
hope that the entire experience of this assembly will be an act of
contemplation," said Franciscan Sister Florence Deacon.

Syndicate content