laudato si

Editorial | Climate agreement or not, we are called to act

Don't be discouraged.

President Donald J. Trump's announcement June 1 that the United States will not honor the Paris agreement on climate doesn't change on our obligation to take care of the earth.

The United States and China, the two largest carbon emitters, and 195 other nations signed the agreement that was ratified in November 2016. The Paris agreement establishes that nations must reduce their carbon dioxide emissions in order to keep global temperatures well-below a 2-degree Celsius increase in relation to pre-industrial levels.

Poor farmers hope to influence climate talks with their stories

A light show illuminated the facade and dome of St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican Dec. 8. The show was sponsored by a coalition of production companies and charitable foundations with the intent to raise awareness about climate change.

PARIS — Thandiwe Chidararume, who farms sweet potatoes, nuts and corn in Zimbabwe, traveled nearly 5,000 miles to be in Paris for the U.N. climate change conference. She wanted to tell negotiators there of the problems she and thousands of other Zimbabwean farmers face due to adverse weather conditions.

For the past couple of years, her crops have gotten either too much rain or not enough. That has meant no money at market and no income to support her three children.

Climate deal must be transformative, papal envoy tells leaders in Paris

VATICAN CITY -- Heads of state discussing carbon emission limits must create a global and "transformative" agreement built on justice, solidarity and fairness, a papal representative told the U.N. climate conference in Paris.

Pope Francis has said "it would be tragic" if special interests "manipulated information" and won out over the common good, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state, said Nov. 30.

The cardinal delivered a speech on behalf of the pope at the Nov. 30-Dec. 11 Conference of Parties, or COP21, in Paris. The Vatican released a copy of the speech Dec. 1.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Care for the poor is at the heart of the Gospel

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson

In June, Pope Francis released his encyclical letter on the environment. I'd like to offer reflections on it.

The title of the letter -- "Laudato Si'" -- is taken from a canticle by St. Francis of Assisi. He's the patron saint not only of Pope Francis' pontificate but also of the environment and those who study the environment. "Care for our common home" is the letter's subtitle.

Contemplate, give thanks, protect: Pope Francis prays for creation

At a prayer service to mark World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation in St. Peter’s Basilica, Pope Francis prayed that people would learn to contemplate God in the beauty of the universe, give thanks and protect all life.

VATICAN CITY -- Leading prayers for the safeguarding of creation, Pope Francis prayed that people would learn to contemplate God in the beauty of the universe, give thanks and protect all life.

At an evening celebration of the World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation, the pope prayed that God would "enlighten the lords of power and money so they would not fall into indifference, but would love the common good, encourage the weak and care for the world in which we live."

Restored prairie at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary offers a glimpse at the past

More than 30 species of native grasses and flowers were planted in 22 acres of the Kenrick-Glennon Seminary grounds in Shrewsbury. Common in the area are yellow and purple coneflowers, black-eyed susan, and wild begamot. 

As the sun came up on a sleepy summer morning, the prairies and woodlands teamed with life.

Squirrels and rabbits scampered about, deer ambled nearby and a fox foraged for rodents. Meanwhile, hummingbirds tasted the sweet nectar of purple beebalms, honey bees pollinated prairie wild flowers, and a horse and buggy with human cargo got its kicks on the dirt trail known later as U.S. Route 66.

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Teak Phillips | teakphillips@archstl.org
More than 30 species of native grasses and flowers were planted in 22 acres of the Kenrick-Glennon Seminary grounds in Shrewsbury. Common in the area are yellow and purple coneflowers, black-eyed susan, and wild begamot.
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