kenrick-glennon seminary

New Holy Land guidebook has ties to Kenrick seminary

A new book guiding Catholics visiting the lands of ancient Israel was born out of the annual Kenrick-Glennon Seminary Holy Land Retreat and Pilgrimage, and in turn will benefit seminarians both here and in Palestine.

Father Charlie Samson is the author of "Come and See: A Catholic Guide to the Holy Land." He was a newly ordained priest of the Archdiocese of St. Louis when he studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem while working on a licentiate in sacred Scripture. While there, he felt called to write a Catholic travel guide to the areas.

‘Historic agreement’ enhances seminary, SLU relationship

St. Louis University president Fred Pestello, left, and Archbishop Robert J. Carlson signed an agreement that will confer undergraduate degrees from SLU to the graduates of Cardinal Glennon College, although they will still study at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary. The agreement was signed April 23 in the Kenrick Board Room at the Cardinal Rigali Center in Shrewsbury.

After the official signing of the collaborative agreement between the archdiocese and St. Louis University, Kenrick-Glennon Seminary academic dean Ed Hogan suggested an action to seal the deal.

"Can we make our first official act one of prayer?" asked Hogan, who quickly received universal approval from the small gathering April 23 in the Kenrick Boardroom at Cardinal Rigali Center.

What an appropriate way to begin the landmark agreement, which Archbishop Robert J. Carlson called, simply, "historic."

Convivium gives seminarians the chance to meet generous benefactors

As guests trickled into the Chase Park Plaza Khorassan Ballroom at about 6 p.m. on Nov. 4, Kenrick-Glennon seminarians anxiously waited to serve them, with the joy of the Gospel visible on the seminarians' smiling faces.

With the exception of serving dinner and busing tables, Kenrick-Glennon's finest performed all of the tasks associated with 25th annual Convivium, the dinner/auction which is the seminary's largest fundraiser.

“Holy Spirit at work”

It'll be an action-packed couple of weeks in November for Kenrick-Glennon Seminary and the archdiocesan Office of Vocations, with five — count 'em, five — significant events compressed into 15 days, focusing on priestly formation now and in the future. And there's a little entertainment mixed in.

With so many vocations events upcoming, it's "game on."

Kenrick-Glennon nears capacity

Kenrick-Glennon seminarians David Halfmann, left, and Tim Markowski joked in the refectory at the seminary. Kenrick-Glennon is almost at capacity, with 132 men filling up all but one of the 133 spots at the seminary.

In his fourth year at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary, David Halfmann has noticed a subtle difference in the first few weeks of the academic year.

There are more seminarians than before.

"Every day I meet three or four more people," said Halfmann, a senior in the Cardinal Glennon College program. "It used to be you'd walk into class and know everybody. Nowadays, I walk into class and don't know half of them. ... I enjoy seeing familiar faces and meeting the new guys."

Seminarians serve as “ambassadors for Christ” at Kenrick-Glennon Days

For Theology III seminarian Tony Ritter, Kenrick-Glennon Days marked the first time he viewed priests as regular guys who enjoy sports and have fun, not as mystery men who wear robes or act serious all the time.

Same with seminarians David Halfmann, a senior in the Cardinal Glennon College program, and Patrick Russell, a Theology III classmate of Ritter. In fact, former campers among seminarians, whether in college or theology programs, tell similar stories about seeing priests as normal people for the first time and opening their hearts and minds to discern God's calling.

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