hope

POPE'S MESSAGE | God wants people to dream big, not listen to cynics

Pope Francis greeted pilgrims as he arrived for his weekly audience Aug. 30 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. The pope continued a series of talks on Christian hope, encouraging people to ignore “disappointed and unhappy people … those who cynically plead not to cultivate hope in life.”

VATICAN CITY — God wants people to live with hope and joy — not bitterness — and to dream with Him of a better world, Pope Francis said.

"Please, make sure we do not pay attention to disappointed and unhappy people; let us not listen to those who cynically plead not to cultivate hope in life," he said Aug. 30 at his weekly general audience.

People must ignore those who try to crush enthusiasm and smother "youthful euphoria," he said. Instead, Christians must cultivate a "healthy utopia" based on what God wants for the world.

DEAR FATHER | Hope is virtue that transforms our understanding of unbaptized babies, heaven

I love my mother. She is a great, holy woman. But whenever she calls me, her first question is, "Where are you?"

When I was a bit younger, this question could make me a bit nervous. But now I understand her question had two meanings. First, it's the natural curiosity of a mother. Second, she wanted to be present with me in her thoughts and prayers in whatever I was doing at that moment.

POPE’S MESSAGE | God gives hope for the future despite present-day suffering

Pope Francis greeted children as he arrived for his weekly audience Aug. 23 in Paul VI hall at the Vatican. In his catechesis talk, the pope explained that Christian hope is based on “faith that God always creates new things” in history, in the cosmos and in everyday life.

VATICAN CITY — While the world reels from terrorism, natural disasters and division, God weeps with those who suffer and offers the hope of a future full of joy and consolation, Pope Francis said.

Recalling the victims of a terror attack in Barcelona Aug. 17, a devastating landslide Aug. 16 in Congo, and "many other" tragic global events, the pope urged Christians to meditate on God's tenderness when "they report sad news, which we are all at risk of becoming accustomed to."

POPE’S MESSAGE | Christians are oriented toward light, hope

Pope Francis embraced a child Aug. 2 at his weekly audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican. The audience was Pope Francis’ first after a month long hiatus in July.

VATICAN CITY — The ancient practice of orienting church buildings East to West — with the entrance facing West and the altar toward the East — was symbolic of the connection that exists between light and hope, Pope Francis said.

"What does it mean to be a Christian? It means looking toward the light, continuing to make a profession of faith in the light, even when the world is wrapped in the night and darkness," Pope Francis said Aug. 2 at his weekly general audience.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Christians share hope, not ‘vinegar of bitterness’

Pope Francis celebrated Mass May 27 on a pastoral visit in Genoa, Italy. The pope visited with workers at a steel mill in the city and ate lunch with 120 refugees, migrants and homeless people.

VATICAN CITY — Christians are called to be "sowers of hope," consoling and defending the poor and anyone in need, Pope Francis said.

As Christians prepared to celebrate Pentecost June 4, Pope Francis used his weekly general audience May 31 to speak about the power of the Holy Spirit to strengthen the hope of believers and to send them forth to instill hope in others.

Sowing bitterness or perplexity, he said, "isn't Christian and if you do this, you aren't Christian. Sow hope. Spread the oil of hope, diffuse the perfume of hope and not the vinegar of bitterness and hopelessness."

Pope, President Trump speak of hopes for peace

Pope Francis greeted President Donald Trump at a private audience at the Vatican May 24. According to a statement from the Vatican, the two discussed several things, including “an exchange of views” on international affairs and on “the promotion of peace in the world through political negotiation and interreligious dialogue, with particular reference to the situation in the Middle East and the protection of Christian communities.”

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis and U.S. President Donald Trump spent 30 minutes speaking privately in the library of the Apostolic Palace May 24, and as the president left, he told the pope, "I won't forget what you said."

The atmosphere at the beginning was formal and a bit stiff. However, the mood lightened when Pope Francis met the first lady, Melania Trump, and asked if she fed her husband "potica," a traditional cake in Slovenia, her homeland. There were smiles all around.

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