healthcare

Health care law: uncertain outcome after multiple diagnoses

WASHINGTON — The Affordable Care Act — on the examination table since President Donald Trump came into office — has been poked, prodded and even pronounced dead while the fight to keep it alive keeps going.

President Trump told Cabinet members Oct. 16: "Obamacare is finished. It's dead. It's gone. ... There is no such thing as Obamacare anymore," but that isn't how health-care reformers, including Catholic leaders, see it, and it isn't the general public's view either, according to a recent poll.

Groups settle in lawsuit against HHS contraceptive mandate

Bishop David A. Zubik of Pittsburgh and Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington talked near the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington in March. On Oct. 16, groups making up the Zubik v. Burwell challenge to the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act reached a settlement with the Justice Department.

WASHINGTON — Dozens of Catholic groups that challenged the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act have reached a settlement with the U.S. Justice Department, they announced late Oct. 16.

The groups, including the Archdiocese of Washington and the Pennsylvania dioceses of Greensburg, Pittsburgh and Erie, were represented by the Cleveland-based law firm Jones Day.

Trump administration expands exemptions on contraceptive mandate

A group of Little Sisters of the Poor joined other women walking down the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington in 2016 after attending oral arguments in the Zubik v. Burwell contraceptive mandate case.

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration Oct. 6 issued interim rules expanding the exemption to the contraceptive mandate for religious employers, such as the Little Sisters of the Poor, who object on moral grounds to covering contraceptive and abortion-inducing drugs and devices in their employee health insurance.

Leaders of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops praised the action as "a return to common-sense, long-standing federal practice and peaceful coexistence between church and state."

Bp. Dewane: Health care laws must begin and end with human person

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., spoke with reporters ahead of a health care vote July 28 on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate rejected legislation to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act.

WASHINGTON — Throughout the summer, while Congress was looking for ways to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. Catholic bishops have continually reiterated the need to put care for the human person at the forefront of any health care legislation.

"Concern for the human person is our beginning and end point," said Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, who has issued multiple statements on health care legislation in the past several weeks.

Partisan disagreement hobbles health care conversation

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., arrived to speak with reporters following a vote to open debate on a health care bill at the U.S. Capitol July 25.

WASHINGTON — When the vice president has to cast a vote to break a tie in the Senate on whether to debate U.S. health care policy, it's obvious that passing legislation related to the Affordable Care Act is going to be a heavy lift in Congress.

Democrats, who boasted of a veto-proof majority to avoid a Senate Republican filibuster, got the ACA passed in 2010. Now, they're in the minority in both the Senate and the House.

Yet in the rush to reject the ACA, there lacks unanimity among Republicans in each chamber to make changes.

Pro-life groups laud the passage of Senate Bill 5

Pro-life groups across Missouri lauded the passage of a bill they say will protect the health and safety of women and unborn children and provide protections for pregnancy resource centers.

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