Health and health care

Prayer, faith and good health

Can prayer, faith and belief in God make you healthy — physically, as well as spiritually and emotionally? Yes, according to dozens of studies over the past 20 years. In fact, Duke University's Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health reported in 2015 that an analysis of more than 1,500 reputable medical studies "indicates people who are more religious and pray more have better mental and physical health," according to Dr. Harold G. Koenig, center director and among the country's leading authorities on faith and healing.

Ascension president/CEO helps meet global needs in Catholic health care

In 1999, the Daughters of Charity National Health System and Sisters of St. Joseph Health System combined forces and sent a clear message in choosing "Ascension Health" as the name of their new entity.

"We wanted to make a statement that this is not about any particular order but this is about the Catholic Church," said Anthony R. Tersigni, president/CEO of St. Louis-based Ascension, which dropped "Health" from its name in 2012.

Finding a Cure for Carson

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Carson Burroughs loves sports. Mention soccer or baseball, and the 7-year-old lights up with excitement.

"I swing the bat," Carson said, showing off his bat and running around the living room. "I want to hit a home run!"

Carson was diagnosed with Sanfilippo Syndrome at the age of 5. The genetic disease causes progressive dementia in children, because of a lacking enzyme that is meant to break down cellular waste in the brain.

Children’s health insurance program in jeopardy

The Missouri Catholic Conference is urging people to contact the state's U.S. senators and representatives to urge continued funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Student-run health clinic fills critical need for foot care

Rosie Booker said she is ticklish, but nonetheless appreciates the health clinic run by St. Louis University medical students, including Jackson Toth, who talked with her while caring for her feet. Routine care includes foot washing and evaluation, nail clipping and callous sanding, with referrals made for advanced needs.

Rosie Booker took a bus, then walked to the Health Resource Center Foot Health Clinic at St. Anthony's Food Pantry in south St. Louis.

She understands the need to take care of her feet because she's often walking to go shopping or to appointments. Besides, she said, "walking is good for you."

Health care law: uncertain outcome after multiple diagnoses

WASHINGTON — The Affordable Care Act — on the examination table since President Donald Trump came into office — has been poked, prodded and even pronounced dead while the fight to keep it alive keeps going.

President Trump told Cabinet members Oct. 16: "Obamacare is finished. It's dead. It's gone. ... There is no such thing as Obamacare anymore," but that isn't how health-care reformers, including Catholic leaders, see it, and it isn't the general public's view either, according to a recent poll.

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