Health and health care

Bp. Dewane: Health care laws must begin and end with human person

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., spoke with reporters ahead of a health care vote July 28 on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate rejected legislation to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act.

WASHINGTON — Throughout the summer, while Congress was looking for ways to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. Catholic bishops have continually reiterated the need to put care for the human person at the forefront of any health care legislation.

"Concern for the human person is our beginning and end point," said Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, who has issued multiple statements on health care legislation in the past several weeks.

Partisan disagreement hobbles health care conversation

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., arrived to speak with reporters following a vote to open debate on a health care bill at the U.S. Capitol July 25.

WASHINGTON — When the vice president has to cast a vote to break a tie in the Senate on whether to debate U.S. health care policy, it's obvious that passing legislation related to the Affordable Care Act is going to be a heavy lift in Congress.

Democrats, who boasted of a veto-proof majority to avoid a Senate Republican filibuster, got the ACA passed in 2010. Now, they're in the minority in both the Senate and the House.

Yet in the rush to reject the ACA, there lacks unanimity among Republicans in each chamber to make changes.

Pro-life groups laud the passage of Senate Bill 5

Pro-life groups across Missouri lauded the passage of a bill they say will protect the health and safety of women and unborn children and provide protections for pregnancy resource centers.

Catholic leaders: Health care reform bill must uphold moral principles

Health care activists protested the Republican health care bill July 17 at the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington. The bill collapsed in the Senate later that day after two more GOP senators said they couldn’t support it.

WASHINGTON — After efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act collapsed late July 17 in the U.S. Senate, Catholic health care leaders said they hope Congress will work together, in small steps, to fix flaws in the current legislation.

The bill lost ground when two Republican senators announced their opposition to it, joining two other senators who opposed the bill and leaving Republican leaders at least two votes short of the 50 needed to start debate on the measure.

A MORE HUMAN SOCIETY | Who speaks for Charlie Gard?

A seriously ill 11-month-old child in Great Britain has garnered the attention of President Donald Trump and Pope Francis and sparked an international debate.

Charlie Gard is unresponsive and totally dependent due to a severe genetic defect that compromises his brain cells' metabolism. His parents want to sustain his life and transfer him to an American hospital for a highly experimental treatment — one that has benefited children with a similar but far less serious condition.

Bishops call latest health care reform effort 'unacceptable'

In a statement about the Better Care Reconciliation Act, Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice wrote, "On an initial read, we do not see enough improvement to change our assessment that the proposal is unacceptable."

WASHINGTON — The Senate Republicans' latest effort to overhaul the Affordable Care Act is "unacceptable" and shows little improvement over the lawmakers' first attempt to reform the federal health care law, said the chairman of the U.S. bishops' domestic policy committee.

"On an initial read, we do not see enough improvement to change our assessment that the proposal is unacceptable," said Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Florida, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development.

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