father john mayo

DEAR FATHER | Reasons vary for pattern in distributing Communion under one or both species

Sometimes, this discussion of offering Holy Communion under both forms turns into a contentious issue. Some feel that when the Precious Blood isn't offered, they don't fully participate in Holy Communion or their rights as Catholics have been infringed upon. Far from feeling united in communion, individuals feel divided.

This view might be motivated by the underlying belief that clergy exclusively possess the Eucharist. Others participate only to the extent that this group allows. However, this view isn't wholly correct.

DEAR FATHER | The Good News of Jesus leads to freedom of life with God

When we hear the word "gospel", our minds immediately turn to the four books at the head of the New Testament. Originally, though, this word had a more expansive meaning.

DEAR FATHER | Father knows best: Trusting God when it comes to prayer

St. Augustine, in his writings on the Sermon on the Mount — one of the places in Scripture Jesus encourages us to ask, seek and knock for the Father's answer to our needs in prayer — comments on why God doesn't seem to answer our prayers. He lists four reasons.

DEAR FATHER | Jesus came to save all, including those who came before Him

In the Gospel of St. John, Jesus refers to Himself as the Good Shepherd (John 10:11, 14). This is for us a very consoling image of Jesus watching over us as members of His flock. We can also think of Jesus as the Good Shepherd who brings back those who have strayed. Both views of Jesus the Good Shepherd bring us great consolation at His loving actions for all of us.

DEAR FATHER | Adoration is a time to concentrate solely on the presence of Jesus

One story told about St. John Vianney, the saintly pastor of Ars in France, is that he often saw a farmer sit in the back of the parish church. The saint noticed that the farmer would spend long periods of time there before the Eucharist. Finally one day, the saint asked him what he did during his time of adoration. The farmer simply responded, "I look at Him and He looks at me."

This is what Eucharistic Adoration is: a time for us to concentrate exclusively on Jesus present before us and allow Him to look back upon us with love.

DEAR FATHER | Jesus Prayer is an opportunity to pray without ceasing

Recently, I was teaching third-graders at the parish school. One of the students asked if the Sign of the Cross was the shortest prayer there was. I responded that I knew a shorter one: the name Jesus.

The power of Jesus' name is apparent from St. Paul's writings, where he tells the Philippians that every knee shall bend and every tongue confess that Jesus is Lord (Philippians 2:11). The confession that Jesus is Lord also forms the most basic and one of the earliest confessions of faith (1 Corinthians 12:3).

How can a name, though, be a prayer?

Syndicate content