faith at home

FAITH AT HOME | How to honor fathers with love

Beer. Golf. TV. Mowing. Burping. Fishing.

According to greeting cards in the store aisles, this is all that modern fathers care about.

Father's Day is clogged with lowbrow stereotypes. Dad just wants to hog the remote control, crack a few crass jokes and drink a cold one.

He's not nurturing, caring or involved. He's not devoted to his wife, children or grandchildren.

But think about the fathers you know. Chances are they defy such silly typecasting. They're washing dishes and changing diapers. They're sacrificing to pay for college or moving to be near grandkids.

FAITH AT HOME | How to widen our hearts on Mother’s Day

For mothers who have lost children.

For children who have lost mothers.

For women who long to be mothers.

For mothers who never got to meet their children.

As my husband and I are writing a book on miscarriage for Catholic couples, I've posed the question on social media: Has your parish's blessing on Mother's Day included prayers for women who long to have a child or women who have lost a child?

FAITH AT HOME | The sacred act of dishwashing

I hate dishwashing.

Laundry, I love: transforming jumbled heaps of tumbled clothes into neat, folded piles. Sweeping is satisfying. Wiping counters, even scrubbing sinks, brings simple pleasure.

But I cringe at crusty pots and pans. Any night of the week, I'd trade for any other chore. Yet life in a household requires rolling up sleeves and doing whatever dirty work needs to be done.

Even in the house of the Church. Turns out the saints agree.

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