Faith and Culture

FAITH AND CULTURE | Listening in the Spirit

In recent times, social conflict has become more pronounced and it's driving much of our human ethos both locally and globally. A glance at the news quickly illustrates the extent of the opposition and division in our world. Ancient quarrels and international divisions linger and find little resolution. At the same time, emerging global struggles aggravate and augment a broken humanity.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Acting in the Spirit

An advantage of our technological world is the ability to engage almost any subject and quickly learn about it. We've grown accustomed to finding things at will, and become uncomfortable when online searches don't yield the desired information. What used to remain unknown or a mystery, now is met with technological searches satisfying our impulses, curiosity and thirst for knowledge.

FAITH AND CULTURE | We are bigger in the Spirit

It's easy to become discouraged by local and world events. Almost every moment of our lives seems permeated by disappointment, senseless violence and tragic occurrences. Neighborhoods, cities and the world mirror the human brokenness and profound divisions that make it difficult for us to feel safe and hopeful.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Commissioned in the Spirit

In the United States, society places a premium on the ability to get things done in a timely fashion. This pragmatic way of being permeates many aspects of our personal and professional lives. In short, we are individually and collectively accustomed to moving with intent and resolve.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Gifted in the Spirit

Our culture places a high value on people's expertise and abilities. We treasure having the right person with the right skill set and personality for a given responsibility. In fact, a whole industry is devoted to researching and finding the perfect candidate for a job. High-performance companies and institutions typically hire trusted firms to run job searches.

Faith and science closely linked

This artist’s concept shows what the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system may look like, based on available data about the planets diameters, masses and distances from the host star. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) telescope, as well as other ground-based observatories. The system was named for the TRAPPIST telescope. The seven planets of TRAPPIST-1 are all Earth-sized and terrestrial, according to research published in 2017 in the journal Nature.

Recent headlines about the TRAPPIST-1 solar system and its seven Earth-sized planets have created quite a buzz among astrophysicists, astronomy lovers and the general population.

Surrounding a dwarf star, the system is relatively close at 40 light years from earth, and three of the planets are in the so-called habitable zone, which means a TRAPPIST-1 planet "easily could have developed a life form," Jesuit Father Robert J. Spitzer said Feb. 27 at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary.

With an important caveat.

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