faith

Faith and science closely linked

This artist’s concept shows what the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system may look like, based on available data about the planets diameters, masses and distances from the host star. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) telescope, as well as other ground-based observatories. The system was named for the TRAPPIST telescope. The seven planets of TRAPPIST-1 are all Earth-sized and terrestrial, according to research published in 2017 in the journal Nature.

Recent headlines about the TRAPPIST-1 solar system and its seven Earth-sized planets have created quite a buzz among astrophysicists, astronomy lovers and the general population.

Surrounding a dwarf star, the system is relatively close at 40 light years from earth, and three of the planets are in the so-called habitable zone, which means a TRAPPIST-1 planet "easily could have developed a life form," Jesuit Father Robert J. Spitzer said Feb. 27 at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary.

With an important caveat.

Faith leaders urge communities to show care for their neighbor

Utah march shows support for refugees, immigrants, celebrates diversity
Marchers participated in Utah’s March for Refugees Feb. 4 in Salt Lake City. The march began at the Wallace Bennett Federal Building with a chain of children, representing diverse cultures and upbringings, holding hands.

The march was a reaction to President Donald Trump’s executive order that prohibited travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States for 90 days and barring all refugees for 120 days.

People of different cultures, religions and beliefs sent a message to lawmakers and to the world that the lives of refugees and immigrants matter and they are welcome in Utah.

WASHINGTON — A coalition of interfaith leaders from the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington gathered at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington on Jan. 31 to announce a vision statement for religious communities in the local area.

The statement, released a day before the start of the United Nations' annual World Harmony Faith Week, arises from the communities' "trust in God and belief that good government is exercised 'under God.'" It also called upon their belief in "our responsibility to serve humanity," which calls them into community.

AN EDITOR’S LIFE | Church teaching, faith formation and broad appeal guides our coverage

Readers frequently write or call to ask why we didn't cover an event or why we published a story. Often these aren't neutral inquiries — they're frequently complaints about news judgment.

The tone of these messages seems to have changed in recent years. Now, rather than simple inquiries, messages are infused with angst — "disgusted," "disturbed" and "disappointed" frequently appear. But ultimately, readers are simply curious about why certain stories are news worthy and others aren't.

The answer is easy: there is no easy answer.

Faith on pointe: Dancer stays grounded in God

“In dance, there are those rare moments that I feel something greater that I can’t explain” said Katherine Monogue, who dances for the Oregon Ballet Company.

PORTLAND, Ore. — A burst of power from her legs carries Katherine Monogue across the dance floor while her arms become a blur of precise movements.

Under a black leotard worn during a rehearsal for a recent performance, the ballerina's stomach muscles flex, keeping the center of her body relatively still as her limbs rapidly extend and retract with control.

Monogue, the youngest professional dancer and only Catholic dancer in the Oregon Ballet Theatre, has a faith that similarly stabilizes the core of her life amid a rewarding but intense career.

Kenrick-Glennon classes to show links of science, theology

Kenrick-Glennon Seminary professor John Finley taught Philosophy of Nature to juniors and pre-theology I students at the seminary.

In some quarters of society, faith and science are considered to be mutually exclusive, akin to oil and water, incompatible with modern life.

One problem with that: It's wrong. The two fit hand in glove.

"Absolutely, they go together," said John Finley, a philosophy professor at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary. "Anything legitimately discovered by science can only help in terms of the overall evangelization effort of our Church ... and our understanding of God's creation.

"Since God is the author of it all, of course, it's going to complement what we learn in theology."

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Suffering for the faith glorifies Jesus and the Church

The first and third readings for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time tell about the incredible future that awaits beyond our troubled times.

Malachi is a prophet, not a Dale Carnegie. He tells how it is, not how we would like to perceive it. His imagery is frank, direct and even brutal. "Lo the day is coming, blazing like an oven, when all the proud and all evildoers will be stubble, and the day that is coming will set them on fire, leaving them neither root nor branch."

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