faith

“Faith moves mountains”

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In the midst of massive flooding in the first week of May, organized efforts and individual efforts helped in the emergency to save life and limb, homes and possessions, and businesses and inventory along the Meramec River — from Pacific in the west to Arnold in the south.

Two such efforts stand out as testaments to the brotherhood of man and to the power of prayer.

Faith group helps with purchase of land, plants in Uganda

Map of Uganda

The hard work and intense study at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary is nearly over for Deacon Joe Lugalambi, a native of Uganda who is serving at St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Oakville.

He'll be ordained a priest in August in his home diocese and serve the people there.

Until recently, only a few people knew of some of the hardships that entails. Priests ordained for the Archdiocese of St. Louis have a place to live, a modest salary and benefits such as health care and a retirement plan. Not so for a priest in the Masaka Diocese in Africa where Deacon Lugalambi will serve.

MAN OF THE HOUSE | Little simplicities offer big lessons

On a pleasantly warm evening, 8-year-old Colin and I are hanging out in the front yard of his house. And my grandson gives me a spiritual lesson.

"Aw," says Colin, looking at their well-groomed lawn. "Where did all the dandelions go?" Immediately, I think: Dandelions are weeds. Weeds are bad. I wish my lawn didn't have so many of those dastardly weeds. But ... "I wanted to pick some of them," he says.

FOR THE JOURNEY | Volunteer corps offer experiences to build faith

The Jesuit Volunteer Corps was young — and so was I — when I arrived at a remote Alaskan village to teach school at a Jesuit boarding school for Native Alaskan students as a member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps.

Cell phones and the Internet did not exist. In the village of St. Mary's, and in other villages on the far-flung Alaskan tundra, there was no television reception. A phone existed for the village — just one — and it was in a man's home.

POPE'S MESSAGE | God promises the ‘impossible,’ asks people hope against all hope

Pope Francis greeted a child at his general audience March 29 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. In his catechesis talk, the pope looked at how Abraham’s faith is held up as a model for everyone in St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans (4:16-25).

VATICAN CITY — Hope is not built on people's predictions, assurances or line of reasoning, Pope Francis said.

Real Christian hope "is not based on our word, but on God's Word" and promises of salvation and eternal life, the pope said at his general audience in St. Peter's Square March 29.

Continuing a series of reflections on how the apostle Paul describes the nature of Christian hope, the pope looked at how Abraham's faith is held up as a model for everyone in St. Paul's Letter to the Romans (4:16-25).

Faith and science closely linked

This artist’s concept shows what the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system may look like, based on available data about the planets diameters, masses and distances from the host star. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) telescope, as well as other ground-based observatories. The system was named for the TRAPPIST telescope. The seven planets of TRAPPIST-1 are all Earth-sized and terrestrial, according to research published in 2017 in the journal Nature.

Recent headlines about the TRAPPIST-1 solar system and its seven Earth-sized planets have created quite a buzz among astrophysicists, astronomy lovers and the general population.

Surrounding a dwarf star, the system is relatively close at 40 light years from earth, and three of the planets are in the so-called habitable zone, which means a TRAPPIST-1 planet "easily could have developed a life form," Jesuit Father Robert J. Spitzer said Feb. 27 at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary.

With an important caveat.

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