encyclical

Fifty years after release, ‘Humanae Vitae’ praised as prophetic encyclical

WASHINGTON — Surrounding the 1968 release of "Humanae Vitae" ("Of Human Life") was the cultural context of the sexual revolution and a widespread fear about overpopulation following World War II, said Donald Critchlow, a professor of history at Arizona State University.

At the time, there were movements in support of eugenics, abortion rights, and sterilizations in an attempt to curb population growth, Critchlow told an audience at The Catholic University of America April 5.

Editorial | Climate agreement or not, we are called to act

Don't be discouraged.

President Donald J. Trump's announcement June 1 that the United States will not honor the Paris agreement on climate doesn't change on our obligation to take care of the earth.

The United States and China, the two largest carbon emitters, and 195 other nations signed the agreement that was ratified in November 2016. The Paris agreement establishes that nations must reduce their carbon dioxide emissions in order to keep global temperatures well-below a 2-degree Celsius increase in relation to pre-industrial levels.

Editorial | Climate agreement or not, we are called to act

Don't be discouraged.

President Donald J. Trump's announcement June 1 that the United States will not honor the Paris agreement on climate doesn't change on our obligation to take care of the earth.

The United States and China, the two largest carbon emitters, and 195 other nations signed the agreement that was ratified in November 2016. The Paris agreement establishes that nations must reduce their carbon dioxide emissions in order to keep global temperatures well-below a 2-degree Celsius increase in relation to pre-industrial levels.

Fifty years later, ‘Populorum Progressio’ takes on new life through Pope Francis

A woman and dog walked amid garbage along a street in 2015 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Blessed Paul VI’s 1967 encyclical “Populorum Progressio” rooted the Catholic Church in solidarity with the world’s poorest nations.

WASHINGTON — These days when Pope Francis talks about integral human development and his vision of a Church that goes to the margins of the world, he likely thanks a predecessor of 50 years ago for the inspiration.

Blessed Paul VI addressed "the progressive development of peoples" as "an object of deep interest and concern to the Church" in his encyclical "Populorum Progressio" ("The Progress of Peoples") that emerged in the years following the Second Vatican Council.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Care for the poor is at the heart of the Gospel

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson

In June, Pope Francis released his encyclical letter on the environment. I'd like to offer reflections on it.

The title of the letter -- "Laudato Si'" -- is taken from a canticle by St. Francis of Assisi. He's the patron saint not only of Pope Francis' pontificate but also of the environment and those who study the environment. "Care for our common home" is the letter's subtitle.

Electric car proves worthy investment for wallet, earth

Jim Struckel, a Cure of Ars parishioner, has solar panels on his roof and owns an electric car, which he charged at Missouri Botanical Garden’s charging station. He said that more world leaders need to promote caring for our earth, as Pope Francis did in the encyclical, ‘Laudato Si.’

Jim Struckel sat in his car -- a sharp-looking compact four-door with an aerodynamic design -- in the shade on the Missouri Botanical Garden's parking lot while reading the daily newspaper.

A closer look showed that his car was hooked up to one of the garden's four electric vehicle charging stations. There is no charge for the use of the charging stations, with a full charge taking between four and five hours.

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