Elementary schools

Archdiocese keeps watchful eye on Boy Scouts organization

While several parishes in the archdiocese have transitioned to American Heritage Girls from the Girl Scouts, the archdiocese has taken a wait-and-see approach with the Boy Scouts of America in the wake of its decision to admit transgender youth.

"We stand largely in the same place we have; we're definitely looking at it with a more watchful eye," said Brian Miller, the executive director of the archdiocese Catholic Youth Apostolate.

‘Men for Christ’

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As the sun set on the second day of Kenrick-Glennon Days on June 6, Archbishop Robert J. Carlson mingled with seminary alumni priests who had come to support the seminarians, counselors and campers at the annual summer camp.

It had been a good day. The boys opened the day with morning prayer, participated in fun-filled activities — including baptism practice — before and after mid-day Mass, then competed in evening Water Olympics, the culmination of fun times at camp.

Seminarians serve as “ambassadors for Christ” at Kenrick-Glennon Days

For Theology III seminarian Tony Ritter, Kenrick-Glennon Days marked the first time he viewed priests as regular guys who enjoy sports and have fun, not as mystery men who wear robes or act serious all the time.

Same with seminarians David Halfmann, a senior in the Cardinal Glennon College program, and Patrick Russell, a Theology III classmate of Ritter. In fact, former campers among seminarians, whether in college or theology programs, tell similar stories about seeing priests as normal people for the first time and opening their hearts and minds to discern God's calling.

Differentiated instruction offers individualized approaches

St. Norbert School kindergarteners Dallas Morhead, left, and Ethan Gramlich used differentiated instruction techniques in math class May 15. The school is part of the Federation of Catholic Schools in the Northeast Deanery, which recently received a $100,000 grant to be used for technology and expanded teaching techniques, including differentiated instruction.

An afternoon math lesson among kindergartners at St. Norbert School was an exercise in cooperation and listening.

At the center of each table was a pile of shapes in several colors and sizes. Their task: separate the pile among three attributes: number of sides, color and shape.

"Think about one attribute at a time," teacher Laura Ernst instructed her students. Coming around to each table, she observed how the children worked together to figure out how the shapes needed to be separated.

"What is this?" Ernst asked student Katie Soloman.

Renaissance in Catholic education continues

Undertaken by the archdiocese in the past year, the Renaissance in Catholic Education stresses engaging changes occurring in schools in St. Louis and North St. Louis County, confronting challenges presented by these changes and offering new school choices for parents and families seeking Catholic education for their children.

Read, Right, Run Marathon has a calming effect

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Outside, the kindergarten through fifth-graders were chatty, energetic and a bit difficult to corral at times.

But once inside Alexian Brothers Sherbrooke Village nursing home, the St. Mark School students were calm and focused. The difference? A couple big bags full of books and a task of reading the books to some of the residents at tables in a commons area.

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