Fontbonne steps up with a game-changing promise

Drawing inspiration from the archdiocesan Today & Tomorrow Educational Foundation, Fontbonne University has made a big promise to financially disadvantaged families — the promise of tuition-free college education.

The Fontbonne Promise, which debuts for the 2018-19 academic year, offers the no-cost opportunity — full tuition and fees for up to five years — for college freshmen who qualify academically but have estimated family contributions of zero on FAFSA, the federal student aid application. The program is open only to Missouri residents.

Academy of the Sacred Heart is bringing back French for its students, in nod to heritage

Language teacher Sara Gaylor read from “Bonsoir Lune” (a translation of “Goodnight Moon”) during French class for first-grade students at Academy of the Sacred Heart.

"Bonsoir lune," Madame Sara Gaylor told her students.

"Bonsoir lune," they repeated in unison.

Reading from the popular children's book, "Goodnight Moon," first-graders at the Academy of the Sacred Heart were hearing a new twist on the old tale — but this time, en Français, translated as "Bonsoir Lune."

“The Celts” land with the Pioneers

Senior, Tyree Galtney transferred to Duchesne High School in St. Charles after their former school, John F. Kennedy High school closed. He chatted with friends before English class began.

The first home football game dispelled any lingering doubt about Duchesne High School's commitment to its newest students — the transfers from John F. Kennedy Catholic High School, which closed in May.

Kennedy Catholic's old mascot, "The Celt," joined the Pioneer mascot at the game vs. St. Charles High, much to the delight of former JFK students and their new cohorts.

Kenrick-Glennon nears capacity

Kenrick-Glennon seminarians David Halfmann, left, and Tim Markowski joked in the refectory at the seminary. Kenrick-Glennon is almost at capacity, with 132 men filling up all but one of the 133 spots at the seminary.

In his fourth year at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary, David Halfmann has noticed a subtle difference in the first few weeks of the academic year.

There are more seminarians than before.

"Every day I meet three or four more people," said Halfmann, a senior in the Cardinal Glennon College program. "It used to be you'd walk into class and know everybody. Nowadays, I walk into class and don't know half of them. ... I enjoy seeing familiar faces and meeting the new guys."

Children with Down Syndrome ‘draw us closer to God’

First grader, Christian Solomon, followed along in his math workbook with his para professional, Miss Mary. Patty and Marty Solomon have two adopted children with Down Syndrome.  Both children attend Immaculate Conception of Dardenne Prairie school.  Christian is in the first grade while Shellye is in the sixth grade. Shellye and Christian are the youngest of nine children.

After only a few weeks at her new school, sixth-grader Shellye Solomon gave an emphatic thumbs-up to Msgr. Ted Wojcicki, the pastor at Immaculate Conception Parish in Dardenne Prairie.

"Shellye told Monsignor that she didn't just like it there ... she LOVES it!" Shellye's mom, Patty Solomon, wrote in a text message.

'Renaissance' begins at South City Catholic Academy


Schools lay out red carpet for renaissance in North County 

By Jennifer Brinker | | twitter:@jenniferbrinker

 The red carpet was rolled out bright and early on Aug. 16 for students at St. Ferdinand School. While it was there to welcome them back on their first day, it also was symbol of the renaissance in Catholic education that's rolling out in North County schools.

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