Editorial | Gun violence: Listen to the students

Good for them, and we hope it'll pay off for us.

Thousands of students and teachers walked out of their classrooms or took part in organized gatherings outdoors during the school day on March 14 as part of the the #Enough! National School Walkout to raise awareness about issues of school safety and the impact of gun violence. The nationwide march was organized by Women's March Youth Empower.

A wedding detour

People were tickled to their romantic core when Pope Francis officiated at an impromptu wedding ceremony in January on an airplane 36,000 feet above Chile.

The marriage in the sky, a papal first, was the type of spontaneous gesture that has made Francis an endearing global figure. It played out like a script from the old TV series "The Love Boat." The only way it would have melted more hearts was if it occurred on Valentine's Day.

Editorial | Open up to conversations about racism

The deep divide. The Delmar divide. These are terms that are used in the discussion of race relations in St. Louis.

There's also a message of hope. That hope is rooted in actions such as in our parishes the weekend of Feb. 17 and 18 when clergy addressed racism. Archbishop Robert J. Carlson made the request of the priests and deacons, pointing out that all people should be treated with dignity and respect.

Editorial | Celebrate our differences in the universal Church

The Nicene Creed.

Catholics succinctly express the profession of faith and Catholic belief in every city, in every state, in every country, hemisphere and continent on the planet.

Regardless of language and culture, the creed is the same worldwide, just as Mass and sacraments are the same between customs and traditions.

Time for the Lenten brush-up

Visiting the sick or homebound is an art of virtue that deepens your Lenten experience.

It's just one of the many ways we can use Lent to refocus and brush away what may have been preventing us from following Jesus. It's neither easy to hear the message of discipleship nor to experience a Christian life amid the clamor of consumerism and the duties of daily life.

GUEST COLUMNIST | Sacred language can lift worshippers

Upon hearing about the Latin Mass, the first response often is a question: Isn't the use of Latin in Catholic worship outdated — something Vatican Council II wanted the modern Church to leave behind?

In fact, the Council's Constitution on the Liturgy decreed, "The use of the Latin language is to be preserved, ... but since the use of the vernacular ... may frequently be of great advantage to the people, a wider use may be made of it, especially in readings, directives, and in some prayers and chants" (Sacrosanctum Concilium, 36).

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