eatmorefish

Marianist group at St. Mary’s tackles racial justice topic

The topic of racial justice is one that a group focused on Marian spirituality might have been inclined to skip.

But Mary led them to it, and the result is a Lenten program being held at St. Mary's High School on Wednesday evenings with a theme of "With Mary Toward Racial Justice." The weekly presentations on Marian spirituality and racial justice are open to the public.

More than just fried cod | Lenten Fridays offer variety of dinner options beyond the standard fare

Seminarians cook their catch at Ryan Lake in Lent of 1916.

Editor's note: Updated Friday, March 3, at 10 a.m. with clarification on dispensation.

It's late afternoon on a Friday in Lent, and you're famished.

It's almost dinner time, so where do you go and what do you eat to satisfy the Lenten abstinence from meat for dinner?

The first option, of course, is a fish fry at either your parish or another in the Archdiocese of St. Louis. (Check out the St. Louis Review's map of parish fish fries to find one of the many from which to choose.)

EDITORIAL | Finding joy of Lent is possible, when viewing through the right lens

It can be difficult to imagine how it's even possible to exude joy during Lent.

Those of us who give up the regular indulgences of ordinary time — chocolate, caffeine, fast food — often find ourselves feeling melancholy, maybe even downright cranky.

We're geared to focus on the penitential nature of Lent. Focusing on our sins isn't particularly pleasant. But as Pope Francis noted in his World Communications Day message for 2017, it's all in how we look at things.

Editorial | Lent is a journey — get moving

It's called a Lenten journey for a reason.

The journey includes prayer, fasting and almsgiving.

Lent is a time for prayer, interior conversion

As Pope Francis described in his 2017 Lenten message, "Lent is a new beginning, a path leading to the certain goal of Easter, Christ's victory over death.

"This season urgently calls us to conversion," he wrote. "Christians are asked to return to God 'with all their hearts' (Joel 2:12), to refuse to settle for mediocrity and to grow in friendship with the Lord."

As we begin Lent on Ash Wednesday, March 1, how do we prepare our hearts for conversion and the path to Easter? Turning toward prayer, through the Scriptures, is one solid suggestion.

Lenten resolution: Commit to live in ways pleasing to God

Resolve to live more consistently in ways pleasing to God this Lent.

That simple advice comes from Father Philip Sosa, provincial superior of the North American Province of the Missionaries of the Holy Family, based in St. Louis at St. Wenceslaus Parish.

"As we begin our Lenten Journey, let us commit to doing more than wearing ashes on our foreheads. Let us resolve to live more consistently in ways pleasing to God, and may He give you whatever you need to testify to His love," Father Sosa wrote before the beginning of Lent.

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