‘Dreamer’ pleased by support from his parish, friends


As a "Dreamer," Eric Reyes doesn't feel as if he's alone because of the support he's received. It comes from groups ranging from young teens to older adults, he said, and is "a great feeling that people don't despise me or don't feel threatened by us. They support the cause, for us being here and fighting for legalization and our right to be here."

"Dreamers" were brought to the United States as children without documentation and were afforded temporary protection under the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program, which now is facing elimination unless Congress acts.

Supreme Court declines DACA case

Sisters of Mercy and others prayed inside the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington Feb. 27 as part of a “Catholic Day of Action for Dreamers” protest to press Congress to protect “Dreamers,” as those covered under DACA program are known.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow to the Trump administration's effort to end a program in March that protects young adults brought to the U.S. without legal permission as minors.

On Feb. 26, the court declined to hear and rule on whether the administration has the right to shut down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA program.

In September, President Donald Trump announced his administration was ending the program, giving lawmakers until March 5 to find a legislative solution to protect the young adults benefiting from DACA.

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