dignity

Bp. Dewane: Health care laws must begin and end with human person

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., spoke with reporters ahead of a health care vote July 28 on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate rejected legislation to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act.

WASHINGTON — Throughout the summer, while Congress was looking for ways to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. Catholic bishops have continually reiterated the need to put care for the human person at the forefront of any health care legislation.

"Concern for the human person is our beginning and end point," said Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, who has issued multiple statements on health care legislation in the past several weeks.

MO ABLE program meets long-term savings needs of people with disabilities

A new program in Missouri allows people with disabilities to save for long-term disability-related expenses via tax-free savings accounts.

State Treasurer Eric Schmitt announced the launch of the MO ABLE program in April. Similar to the 529 college savings plan, Missourians who contribute to ABLE accounts will be eligible for a tax deduction of up to $8,000, or $16,000 if married and filing jointly.

Editorial | Many topics, one thread — life

Lives matter.

In the last few years, we have seen variations of this phrase within concentrated movements: Black Lives Matter. Police Lives Matter. Unborn Lives Matter.

What unites all of these movements is the subject at hand — life.

Editorial | Life issues intertwined

Human life is sacred. The dignity of the human person is the foundation of a moral vision for society.

But at times, society operates contrary to that foundation.

We continue to see human life under attack through abortion and euthanasia. The value of human life is threatened by embryonic stem-cell research, the death penalty and hybridization — last month scientists announced a successful human/pig chimera: an organism containing cells of two species.

The Church upholds the value of respecting life, from conception to natural death.

POPE’S MESSAGE | Christians called to restore dignity to sick, imprisoned

Pope Francis arrived to lead his general audience Nov. 9 in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. The pope’s catechesis focused on two works of mercy, visiting the sick and visiting the imprisoned.

VATICAN CITY — Visiting the sick and the imprisoned are works of mercy that not only benefit the suffering and the abandoned, but benefit the visitors who are enriched by being with those who suffer like Christ, Pope Francis said.

While the works of mercy are ancient, they still are relevant today for those who are deprived of freedom and "suffer one of the greatest hardships of human beings," the pope said Nov. 9 at his weekly general audience.

We respect life when we belong

Respect for life and the word "belong" have a lot in common.

Pope Francis cites our "throwaway culture that treats human life as disposable." The elderly are marginalized and the lives of people with disabilities are deemed less worth living. Babies in the womb who are unwanted are aborted.

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