creation

‘Hear the cry of the earth,’ pope and patriarch urge in ecology message

A boy walked along the flooded area Aug. 14 in Saptari district of Nepal. Marking the Sept. 1 World Day of Prayer for Creation, Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople issued a joint message urging government and business leaders to heal our wounded creation.

VATICAN CITY — Environmental destruction is a sign of a "morally decaying scenario" in which too many people ignore or deny that, from the beginning, "God intended humanity to cooperate in the preservation and protection of the natural environment," stated the leaders of the Catholic and Orthodox Churches.

Marking the Sept. 1 World Day of Prayer for Creation, Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople issued a joint message.

Editorial | God’s vision is perfectly clear

Diamond ring beams and solar flares during near totality of the solar eclipse on Aug. 21.

Praise be to you, my Lord." These are the words that open Pope Francis' encyclical on ecology and care for God's creation. Quoting St. Francis of Assisi's Canticle of the Sun, the pope reminds us that our common home is like a sister with whom we share our life and a beautiful mother who opens her arms to embrace us.

This was apparent on Aug. 21 when many in the archdiocese witnessed a total solar eclipse. What a spectacular scene as a false dusk settled in mid-afternoon, the sun's heat was tempered, cicadas sang, street lights glowed, and stars and planets winked.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Jesus restores the order of creation

Throughout the coming week, the daily readings prompt us to reflect on the order God has written into the world through creation and the covenant, what happens when we turn away from that order, and how Jesus came to restore it.

Faith vs. science: they're not mutually exclusive

Father Robert Spitzer, SJ is the president of the Magis Center of Reason and Faith, an organization that explains the close connection between faith and reason in contemporary astrophysics, philosophy and historical study of the New Testament.

Television critics touted the popular 1990s sitcom "Seinfeld" as a "show about nothing."

The program used that description often in its nine-year run and even based an episode on Jerry Seinfeld, playing himself, and George Costanza, played by Jason Alexander, pitching "a show about nothing" to NBC executives.

But even Jerry and George quibbled about the meaning of "nothing."

"Even nothing is something," Jerry assures the execs, later adding to George's description of an episode about going to work, "Well, uh, maybe something happens on the way to work."

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