contraception

New U.K. guidance may hurt those who won't dispense morning-after pill

LIVERPOOL, England -- British doctors and nurses who refuse to dispense the morning-after pill on grounds of conscience will be unable to receive a specialist diploma in sexual health care.

Guidance issued by the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare states that medical professionals who, for religious reasons, refuse to hand out "emergency" contraception cannot receive the qualification.

The diploma is considered to represent the "gold standard" of sexual health care training, a source at the faculty told Catholic News Service in an April 30 telephone conversation.

Univision poll shows strong support for church teaching in Asia, Africa

MEXICO CITY -- A poll by Spanish-language broadcaster Univision shows Catholics in Asia and Africa, where the Church is growing fastest, expressing strong support for Church teachings.

The poll of self-identified Catholics in 12 countries showed high approval of Pope Francis, but split on subjects such as abortion, priests being able to marry and same-sex marriage.

Editorial | Rebelling against the culture

A new poll by Spanish-language broadcaster Univision highlighting countries where support for Church teachings is the highest and lowest has garnered much attention.

The poll became fodder for much of the secular media in the United States wanting to point out divisions between Church hierarchy and its members. "The pope's Catholic problem" was the headline of a commentary in the Chicago Tribune, for example. It stated that on every issue, Catholics in the United States are more liberal than the Church's teachings.

Judge dismisses archdiocese's lawsuit against HHS mandate

A federal judge has dismissed lawsuit from the Archdiocese of St. Louis and Catholic Charities against the United States government, which challenges the constitutionality of the HHS health care mandate.

Catholic health care workers, organizations denounce AAP statement on emergency contraception

This is the first story in a two-part series on recent statements made by medical organizations on contraception.

Providing emergency contraception to adolescent girls isn't good health care, according to several Catholic health care professionals and professional organizations.

Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement encouraging pediatricians to provide advance prescriptions for emergency contraception to teens. The statement was published in the December issue of the academy's online journal.

Syndicate content