conscience rights

Cdl. Dolan, Abp. Kurtz praise new HHS conscience protection policies

WASHINGTON -- New policies put in place by the civil rights office of the federal Department of Health and Human Services won praise from two former presidents of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

"We applaud HHS for its significant actions to protect conscience rights and religious freedom," said a joint Jan. 19 statement by Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York, now chairman of the bishops' Committee on Pro-Life Activities, and Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Ky., chair of their Committee for Religious Liberty.

Mayor signs reproductive decisions bill opposed by archdiocese

Lisa Johnston  |  lisajohnston@archstl.org  |  twitter: @aeternusphoto

Ward 08 Alderman Stephen Conway voiced his disapproval for Board Bill 203 during discussion at the Board of Aldermen meeting. The St. Louis City Board of Aldermen voted to perfect Board Bill 203. The proposed St. Louis City ordinance was proposed to prohibit discrimination based on a person's reproductive health decisions or pregnancy. The Archdiocese of St. Louis believes the bill would cause religious persecution and discrimination and violates the U.S. Constitution and U.S. Supreme Court precedent, and violates state and federal laws.

Update at 5:20 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 15:

A new law in the City of St. Louis prohibits discrimination based on a person's reproductive decisions or pregnancy.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed the bill passed by the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on a 17-10 vote Feb. 10. Several members of the board spoke in opposition, saying it's a solution to a problem that doesn't exist and causes unnecessary divisiveness.

BEFORE THE CROSS | Remembering the past as we face challenges

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson hosted a meeting Nov. 9 with Missouri bishops and major superiors of religious congregations at the Cardinal Rigali Center. They celebrated Mass in the St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at the Cardinal Rigali Center. Archbishop Carlson smiled as he listened to a homily by Father Roger Landry, an attaché to the Holy See Mission to the United Nations.

Imagine a time when nominally faithful people adopted the values of the surrounding culture because it was hard to be different.

Imagine a time when people hid their religious identity so that they could get along with others who didn't share their faith.

Imagine a time when a nation's ruler decided that everyone should abandon their particular religious ideas in order to be united -- and many of the faithful agreed. Imagine that this same ruler offered positions of honor to those who betrayed their faith and persecuted those who did not.

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