community

Filling bellies and minds

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Kim Davis came home one day last spring to find three neighborhood kids sitting on the front steps of her home in the Ville neighborhood of north St. Louis.

She didn't know them. They got up to scatter, and she told them, "You don't have to go anywhere." After a few minutes of conversation, the youngest asked for a nickel. The kids didn't have much food in the house, and they wanted something to eat. An older sibling chimed in, and asked if there was anything they could do to earn a little bit of money.

Incarnate Word Sisters to establish space in St. Louis City for novitiate, community living

A former banquet hall will become a new space for the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, a home for the community's novitiate and a place to promote intergenerational and intercultural living.

The sisters, based in San Antonio, purchased the 5,600-square-foot building in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of south St. Louis earlier this spring. Sisters Cathy Vetter and Helena Monahan, along with a novice, Miriam Bannon, will be the first residents. The house is undergoing renovations and is expected to be completed by spring.

Little Sisters of the Poor still need help from the community

Although the Little Sisters of the Poor announced last year they would withdraw from ministry at their St. Louis Residence, they are still serving the needy elderly there and need assistance. Sister Joseph Maureen Hobin, LSP, joked with 99-year-old resident Thelma McCafferty before a Mardi Gras party. McCafferty was born and raised just a few blocks from the sisters’ St. Louis Residence.

The Little Sisters of the Poor have a clear and simple message to share with the St. Louis community: They're still here and they still need your help.

In August, the sisters announced a plan to withdraw from their ministry in St. Louis after 147 years. They cited an aging community and decrease in sufficient vocations to effectively staff their residence for the needy elderly in north St. Louis.

Habitat for Humanity volunteer enjoys helping people

James Kennedy, left, is being honored as a 2016 Ageless Remarkable St. Louisan by the St. Andrew’s Resources for Seniors System. He and fellow volunteer Kathy Brasser served a meal to homeless and needy people at St. Vincent de Paul Parish Oct. 1.

When James Kennedy retired in 1994, he envisioned an opportunity to complete projects around his house.

Kennedy, 77, retired at age 55 as chief information officer at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Community in Christ

In this current age, many of us are accustomed to doing things by sheer will and resolve. We value rugged individualism and take great pride in personal efforts. The Olympics were a great illustration of this high value of individual performance and achievement. In this extraordinary gathering of cultures and peoples, we witnessed how ordinary men and women exhibited extraordinary grit and determination in competition.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Mercy and the gift of community

F. Javier Orozco

In our contemporary world, it isn't difficult to see how the traditional sense of community is changing significantly. Our sense of belonging to something greater than ourselves, our ability to be part of a cohesive identity and our feeling of safety are challenged.

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