christina capecchi

TWENTY SOMETHING | ‘Let your yes mean yes’: Honesty with God and others

Rachel Gardner has a bad habit, shared by many young adults: She says "yes" when she ought to say "no."

A friend might ask to do lunch on Wednesday.

"I say, 'Of course,'" Rachel recounted, "and in my head, I can see my totally squashed schedule."

The friend asks if noon works.

"I say, 'Sounds great,' knowing I have something at 1:30 p.m.," Rachel confessed.

Then comes the moment she knows she should leave their lunch, but she hesitates to cut the time short — "time I didn't have in the first place."

TWENTY SOMETHING | A big win for the little guy

Art Cullen may have his gripes about Catholicism, but he can't deny its influence on the work that last month won him a Pulitzer Prize.

The story went viral: Small-town newspaper editor beats out the likes of The Washington Post and the Houston Chronicle to earn journalism's highest honor. Score one for the little guy — in this case, The Storm Lake Times, a family-owned paper in Iowa with a 10-person staff and a circulation of 3,000.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Evangelization by hitchhiking

The Little Poor Friars and Poor Nuns of Jesus and Mary, a new religious community with a long name, dress and live like St. Francis of Assisi: in poverty, entirely dependent on God's providence. They were founded in 1999 by a 25-year-old Sicilian and approved by the Catholic Church in 2014.

TWENTY SOMETHING | ‘Greater horizons’: Tending to each other and our common home

"One should leave a field better than you found it," an old farmer's saying went.

Sometimes that called for heavy lifting. Other times it just meant picking up a rock as you crossed and placing it at the field's edge.

That counsel stuck with Sister Amy Hereford, CSJ, who grew up on a 10-acre farm in Missouri where sheep roamed and blackberries grew wild. She planted whatever vegetable seemed to be lacking.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Angels among us: Helping leads to healing

Spend a day in a surgery waiting room and you'll witness a hundred quiet acts of mercy.

Strangers gather for a host of reasons with a common cause: to sit beneath the slowest clock and wait it out. They make calls, utter prayers and flip through magazines, and in their anxiety, they extend morsels of compassion: smiles and small talk, directions to the cafeteria and tips on its offerings. One person shown the way by someone slightly less new; flashes of humanity while loved ones down the hall are put under.

TWENTY SOMETHING | The pursuit of happiness in the new year

Don Currey was a 30-year-old graduate student when he was responsible for cutting down the world's oldest tree.

A geography student at the University of North Carolina, Don wanted to better understand Ice-Age glaciology by examining bristlecone trees. In the summer of 1964, he was in a grove of bristlecones on Wheeler Peak Mountain in Nevada when his tree corer got stuck in a tree.

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