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TWENTY SOMETHING | Hurricane Harvey and the kayaking priest

Hurricane Harvey stranded Father David Bergeron in his pickup the night it ripped through Houston. The 38-year-old priest visited his brother and had to pull over on an overpass three miles from his home in the flood-ravaged southeast side of the city.

He couldn't make it any farther or go back, so he curled up in his truck and tried to sleep as thunder and sirens alternated — rain pounding, wind howling, his beloved city churning in despair.

The next morning was eerily quiet.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Lead with beauty: Evangelization lessons from the solar eclipse

The rain fell heavy that Monday morning in Des Moines, Iowa.

Bleary-eyed travelers plotted alternative routes over eggs and potatoes at the Embassy Suites.

A white-haired man wearing a Saturn shirt had heard it would be clearer in Columbia, Mo., than Kansas City, Mo., and decided to attempt the added hour of travel for a better view of the Great American Eclipse.

"If we can't make it there in time," he said, "our ship is sunk."

TWENTY SOMETHING | ‘Priest holes’ and history lessons help us embrace our ancient faith

Nicholas Owen was canonized 364 years after his death.

Such is often the case with the Catholic Church, charged with curating a 2,000-year treasure trove of saints and stories, rovers and relics.

Owen's tale is unlike any other. Born in Oxford, England, in the mid-16th century, his devout family prepared him well for his remarkable life's work. His father was as a carpenter who taught him the trade. Two older brothers became priests, bringing the sacraments to a hungry community.

TWENTY SOMETHING | History and humility: an old man’s plea to young adults

The old man with the typewriter would like to say to certain people among us: Don't be a blockhead.

David McCullough's bestselling new book, "The American Spirit," takes up a cause he has long championed, lends it added urgency and aims it squarely at young adults.

"We are raising a generation of young Americans who are by and large historically illiterate," McCullough writes.

TWENTY SOMETHING | ‘Let your yes mean yes’: Honesty with God and others

Rachel Gardner has a bad habit, shared by many young adults: She says "yes" when she ought to say "no."

A friend might ask to do lunch on Wednesday.

"I say, 'Of course,'" Rachel recounted, "and in my head, I can see my totally squashed schedule."

The friend asks if noon works.

"I say, 'Sounds great,' knowing I have something at 1:30 p.m.," Rachel confessed.

Then comes the moment she knows she should leave their lunch, but she hesitates to cut the time short — "time I didn't have in the first place."

TWENTY SOMETHING | A big win for the little guy

Art Cullen may have his gripes about Catholicism, but he can't deny its influence on the work that last month won him a Pulitzer Prize.

The story went viral: Small-town newspaper editor beats out the likes of The Washington Post and the Houston Chronicle to earn journalism's highest honor. Score one for the little guy — in this case, The Storm Lake Times, a family-owned paper in Iowa with a 10-person staff and a circulation of 3,000.

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