christina capecchi

TWENTY SOMETHING | On cracked knuckles & self-care: A resolution for 2018

The themes emerge predictably. When it comes to New Year's resolutions, we gravitate toward the biggies: get healthy, get organized, get a life. We vow to travel more, read more, save more and volunteer more. We conjure visions of the expansive, to live life to the fullest.

Scan Twitter and you'll find a multitude of plans.

"In 2018, I will skydive. No exceptions."

"Put myself out there. Don't be afraid of making a mistake."

"No more plastic bags!!"

"I'd like my life to be as on point as my eyebrows in 2018."

"I resolve to use my cookbooks more often!"

TWENTY SOMETHING | The art of giving, the challenge of Advent

Oprah Winfrey sang and clapped when presented with the $69 lunch box that made her 2017 "Favorite Things" list.

"I looooove!" she belted out in mock falsetto.

She didn't need to finish her sentence by naming the object of her love. The list of items is expansive; in a video of the selection process for her biggest gift guide, it covers 102 items, totaling $13,400 in value and ranging from a $2,000 55-inch Samsung high-definition TV down to a $10 earbud case.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Finding ways to give thanks despite feeling empty

Even before she was married, Emily Stimpson Chapman asked for baby prayers.

"I'd be in an antique store buying little trinkets for the wedding decorations, and I would be asking strangers: 'Pray that we have a baby!'" she said.

The Pittsburgh-based Catholic writer had long yearned to enter into motherhood, so when the love of her life got down on bended knee, she began dispensing prayer requests. She was 40, and math was not on her side.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Hurricane Harvey and the kayaking priest

Hurricane Harvey stranded Father David Bergeron in his pickup the night it ripped through Houston. The 38-year-old priest visited his brother and had to pull over on an overpass three miles from his home in the flood-ravaged southeast side of the city.

He couldn't make it any farther or go back, so he curled up in his truck and tried to sleep as thunder and sirens alternated — rain pounding, wind howling, his beloved city churning in despair.

The next morning was eerily quiet.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Lead with beauty: Evangelization lessons from the solar eclipse

The rain fell heavy that Monday morning in Des Moines, Iowa.

Bleary-eyed travelers plotted alternative routes over eggs and potatoes at the Embassy Suites.

A white-haired man wearing a Saturn shirt had heard it would be clearer in Columbia, Mo., than Kansas City, Mo., and decided to attempt the added hour of travel for a better view of the Great American Eclipse.

"If we can't make it there in time," he said, "our ship is sunk."

TWENTY SOMETHING | ‘Priest holes’ and history lessons help us embrace our ancient faith

Nicholas Owen was canonized 364 years after his death.

Such is often the case with the Catholic Church, charged with curating a 2,000-year treasure trove of saints and stories, rovers and relics.

Owen's tale is unlike any other. Born in Oxford, England, in the mid-16th century, his devout family prepared him well for his remarkable life's work. His father was as a carpenter who taught him the trade. Two older brothers became priests, bringing the sacraments to a hungry community.

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