children

DEAR FATHER | Seeing the Trinity in daily life helps us understand the mystery

The Blessed Trinity is the central mystery of our faith (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 234), the mystery of who God is Himself. Since it's at the heart of our faith, it's essential that children begin to understand the Trinity, so that they may know who God is and relate to Him better.

The trouble with trying to explain and to understand the Blessed Trinity is that the Trinity is a mystery. This doesn't mean that we don't know anything about the Trinity; we do know some things but not others.

Editorial | They’re watching us

The news out of Our Lady School simultaneously heartened and disheartened Father Jeffrey Maassen, pastor at the parish in Festus.

On one hand, the school's eighth-graders wanted to be regulars at Sunday Masses, a precept of Catholicism.

On the other, if they expressed this desire, then it must not be happening on a regular basis.

"When I hear my eighth-graders saying, 'I want to go Mass,' that to me is 'Wow,'" Father Maassen said, adding, "It's awesome that they said that, but it's sad, too, because it indicates parents aren't (taking them), which is heartbreaking."

Campaign enhances discipline program at Catholic schools

Holy Trinity School in St. Ann strives to meet its students' academic needs and develop their potential while calling them to be witnesses of the Gospel through their words and actions.

The process of developing problem-solving skills and leadership qualities is easier at the school thanks to the Virtue-Based Restorative Discipline program pioneered by the school the past six years after being developed for the archdiocese by educator Lynne Lang.

Marked by love

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COCHABAMBA, Bolivia -

They're the children of children who've been living on the streets. Babies born to drug-addicted mothers. Youngsters who've seen horrible things or been abused.

Here, they find love.

It's a 2-year-old lovingly embraced by a staff member. A baby fed by a woman religious. A 3-year-old encouraged and given structure from his classroom teacher. A child with prosthetic leg helped by a physical therapist.

Community discussions break down walls of stigma of mental illness in youths

Tamara Kenny and her son Eli take a daily walk at Francis Park to check in with each other and talk about their days before heading home for dinner. Eli, who lives with autism and bipolar disorder, uses the time with his mom to communicate how he’s feeling.

Taking a walk in Francis Park is how Eli Engel decompresses after school.

He talks with his mom, Tamara, about how his day went and how he's feeling. Checking in on his mental well-being is an important part of their routine.

The 17-year-old has an outgoing, fun personality. He likes writing rap lyrics under the pseudonym "Bulldog." His favorite subject is math, and he's a strict vegetarian, citing a need to protect all creation — even little ladybugs.

But the last several years have been tough on Eli, who has bipolar disorder.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Thirteen sons, no daughters, no reality TV shows

Christina Capecchi

The wedding that Tyler Schwandt and his fiancée are planning could've been broadcast on national TV. But he's perfectly content with a quieter, more intimate wedding Mass.

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