Catholic education

NCEA honors Archbishop Carlson

Since arriving eight years ago in the Archdiocese of St. Louis, Archbishop Robert J. Carlson has stressed the importance of Catholic education.

His support has been evident at the local level, but now, he's receiving national acclaim.

The National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) named Archbishop Carlson as a 2017 recipient of its prestigious Seton Award, given "annually to exemplary individuals whose support and service impacts Catholic education and the well-being of our nation's youth."

Catholic education is a ministry, newbie teachers learn at orientation

Just weeks before the start of the school year, a crop of new Catholic school teachers assembled at the Cardinal Rigali Center for orientation into their new roles.

No doubt some of them were just as nervous as their students likely will be on the first day. Elementary schools in the archdiocese begin classes the week of Aug. 14, with most high schools starting around that time.

Renaissance in Catholic education continues

Undertaken by the archdiocese in the past year, the Renaissance in Catholic Education stresses engaging changes occurring in schools in St. Louis and North St. Louis County, confronting challenges presented by these changes and offering new school choices for parents and families seeking Catholic education for their children.

Catholic educators’ dedication shows at convention in St. Louis

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Sister Judith Abique, SPC, will integrate Theology of the Body concepts in religious education at St. Joseph School in Waipahu, Hawaii, as a result of a session she attended at the NCEA Convention and Expo in St. Louis.

BRIMMING WITH HOPE | The beauty of science and Catholic education

The 1633 trial of Galileo Galilei is often used as evidence that the Catholic Church opposes scientific thought. The reality is that the Catholic Church has had a fruitful relationship with science and has been one of its biggest proponents. Scientific historian J.L. Heilbron asserts, "The Roman Catholic Church gave more financial aid and social support to the study of astronomy for over six centuries ... than any other, and probably, all other, institutions."

Balance of solidarity, subsidiarity guide future of Catholic schools

The proposal of three school models in the Archdiocese of St. Louis signals a major shift in the way the Catholic Education Office operates and how they're looking at the future of Catholic education in St. Louis.  Students at Blessed Teresa of Calcutta will be an Archdiocesan School model. Makalo Spencer seemed to raise his hand for every question about subjective personal pronouns during his sixth grade language arts lesson.

Kurt Nelson sees the future of Catholic education in the archdiocese as that of balancing a set of scales. On one side you have subsidiarity — the principle of making decisions at the most local level possible. On the other, you've got solidarity — Catholics throughout the archdiocese acting together as one Body in Christ.

"We want people to do the things they need to do, to have those freedoms," the superintendent of Catholic education said. "And where they have challenges, we want the solidarity piece to show how we are working as a larger Church. It's a balancing of both of these."

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