Catholic education

Bishops consider ways to revitalize appeal of a Catholic education

WASHINGTON — Catholic bishops are looking to "transform" Catholic schools in response to decades of declining enrollment that has forced hundreds of schools to close since 2005.

The effort, said the chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Catholic Education, encompasses a wide-ranging look at issues facing Catholic schools and a renewed effort to help parents better understand that the spiritual development of a child goes hand in hand with academic achievement.

NCEA honors Archbishop Carlson

Since arriving eight years ago in the Archdiocese of St. Louis, Archbishop Robert J. Carlson has stressed the importance of Catholic education.

His support has been evident at the local level, but now, he's receiving national acclaim.

The National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) named Archbishop Carlson as a 2017 recipient of its prestigious Seton Award, given "annually to exemplary individuals whose support and service impacts Catholic education and the well-being of our nation's youth."

Catholic education is a ministry, newbie teachers learn at orientation

Just weeks before the start of the school year, a crop of new Catholic school teachers assembled at the Cardinal Rigali Center for orientation into their new roles.

No doubt some of them were just as nervous as their students likely will be on the first day. Elementary schools in the archdiocese begin classes the week of Aug. 14, with most high schools starting around that time.

Renaissance in Catholic education continues

Undertaken by the archdiocese in the past year, the Renaissance in Catholic Education stresses engaging changes occurring in schools in St. Louis and North St. Louis County, confronting challenges presented by these changes and offering new school choices for parents and families seeking Catholic education for their children.

Catholic educators’ dedication shows at convention in St. Louis

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Sister Judith Abique, SPC, will integrate Theology of the Body concepts in religious education at St. Joseph School in Waipahu, Hawaii, as a result of a session she attended at the NCEA Convention and Expo in St. Louis.

BRIMMING WITH HOPE | The beauty of science and Catholic education

The 1633 trial of Galileo Galilei is often used as evidence that the Catholic Church opposes scientific thought. The reality is that the Catholic Church has had a fruitful relationship with science and has been one of its biggest proponents. Scientific historian J.L. Heilbron asserts, "The Roman Catholic Church gave more financial aid and social support to the study of astronomy for over six centuries ... than any other, and probably, all other, institutions."

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