bishop robert j hermann

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Trinitarian unity provides the answer to all the world’s hatred

My favorite image of the Holy Trinity is in the large dome in the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis. It depicts the crucifixion, with the Father on His throne behind the crucifix, His arms outstretched and His hands holding Christ's hands to the cross. On the right side is a depiction of a dove as a symbol of the Holy Spirit.

In a nutshell, this image conveys the simple message: The Father, His Son Jesus and the Holy Spirit conspire to save us.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Divine Mercy is an explosion of God’s love

As exciting as Christ's resurrection was to the apostles on Easter Sunday morning, what happens on Easter Sunday evening is even more exciting.

On Easter Sunday morning, the apostles were very excited that Jesus rose from the dead. This knowledge brought joy to their hearts, because they were looking forward to reconnecting with Him.

However, Jesus realized on Easter Sunday morning His work was not completed, so He revisited them in the evening when the doors were locked. What they experienced that night they couldn't fully appreciate until the Feast of Pentecost.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Christ invites us to participate in the Father’s holiness

The readings for the Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time suggest there is no limit to our participation in Godliness. The first reading states: "Be holy, for I, the Lord, your God, am holy." That's our open invitation to allow God to possess us with His holiness. He doesn't limit our participation in His goodness.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | We are selected by Jesus to witness His Gospel values

The readings for the Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time reveal the goodness God desires to place in the hearts of His people.

In the first reading from Isaiah, God tells us that when we share the goodness He has bestowed upon us, we will experience His godliness within ourselves.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | A thirst for God is His gift to us

In seeking the greatest gift, what we are looking for isn't a rich man to bail us out of poverty, but rather the One who lived in poverty, died as a criminal and now invites us into His poverty. The greatest gift that we receive from God is the very hunger to seek Him.

This seeking is much like our body looking for the next breath. The air we inhale isn't ours, and we can't hold on to it, but we have to exhale it so as to seek more of what we can't possess. Yet this constant seeking gives us life and energy.

I THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW | Christ’s call to us is an answer to our hunger for the infinite

Perhaps the responsorial psalm for the third Sunday in Ordinary Time summarizes God's movement in the day's readings. God answers mankind's hunger for the infinite and He is man's light, salvation and refuge.

He alone speaks to the deepest hunger for the infinite placed in the heart of man. "One thing I ask of the Lord; this I seek: to dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, that I may gaze on the loveliness of the Lord and contemplate His temple," the psalmist wrote. "Wait for the Lord with courage; be stouthearted, and wait for the Lord."

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