bishop braxton

Bishop Braxton calls action to end racism imperative for every American

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., addressed students, faculty, and social workers during a “teach-in” on fighting racism held Sept. 21 at The Catholic University of America in Washington.

WASHINGTON — Every person "must do something," whether big or small, to address racism in the United States, Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., told an audience at The Catholic University of America.

From taking a public stance at a rally to reaching out to a neighbor, racism can be addressed and overturned, the bishop said during a presentation at a Sept. 21 "teach-in" on fighting racism sponsored by the university's National Catholic School of Social Service.

Cdl. Cupich: Church will do everything it can ‘to end scourge of violence’

People carried crosses with names of victims of gun violence as part a march in downtown Chicago to remember those killed in gun violence in 2016. On April 4, Cardinal Blaise J. Cupich announced an initiative to increase the work of current anti-violence programs in the Archdiocese of Chicago.

CHICAGO — Chicago Cardinal Blase J. Cupich April 4 announced an initiative to increase the work of current anti-violence programs in parishes and schools and those run by Mercy Home for Boys and Girls, Catholic Charities and Kolbe House, the archdiocese's jail ministry.

The Archdiocese of Chicago also will seek out partnerships to increase programs that will help break the cycle of violence.

Reflection on U.S. 'racial divide' is personal for Bishop Braxton

Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, Ill., delivered the homily at the opening Mass at the National Black Catholic Congress XI in 2012 in Indianapolis.

BELLEVILLE, Ill. -- In a 19-page reflection on the "racial divide" in the United States, Bishop Edward K. Braxton of Belleville, who is African-American, said he twice had been the victim of what he considered to be unjust police attitudes.

The episodes "made me very conscious of the fact that simply by being me, I could be the cause of suspicion and concern without doing anything wrong," Bishop Braxton wrote in "The Racial Divide in the United States: A Reflection for the World Day of Peace 2015," issued Jan. 1.

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