BB203

Taking the culture of death to court

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke with Frank O'Brien of O'Brien Industrial Holdings, LLC, on the steps of the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse.

History is repeating itself for Frank O'Brien.

Several years ago, the Catholic business owner filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, challenging a mandate that required most employers to purchase health insurance for their employees, including coverage for contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs.

St. Louis Catholics file lawsuit against St. Louis City abortion ordinance

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Archbishop Robert J. Carlson reiterated that the archdiocese "will not comply" with a St. Louis ordinance that violates religious freedom.

St. Louis archdiocesan elementary schools joined Our Lady's Inn, O'Brien Industrial Holdings LLC and Frank Robert O'Brien in a federal lawsuit filed May 22 by the Thomas More Society. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.

St. Louis Catholics file lawsuit over reproductive decisions ordinance

Photo by Lisa Johnston | lisajohnston@archstl.org  | Twitter @aeternusphoto Archbishop Robert J. Carlson spoke May 22 at a press conference announcing a federal lawsuit filed against the city of St. Louis over an ordinance that adds reproductive decisions as protected classes.

UPDATED MAY 22 AT 12:00 PM

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson reiterated that the archdiocese "will not comply" with a St. Louis ordinance that violates religious freedom.

St. Louis archdiocesan elementary schools joined Our Lady's Inn, O'Brien Industrial Holdings LLC and Frank Robert O'Brien in a federal lawsuit filed May 22 by the Thomas More Society. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.

House OKs legislation to protect alternatives-to-abortion agencies

The Missouri legislature took another step toward protecting alternatives to abortion agencies and pre-empting cities from enacting ordinances that infringe upon the religious liberty rights of individuals and organizations.

The Missouri House on March 30 approved HB174, which acknowledges the rights of alternatives-to-abortion agencies, such as pregnancy resource centers and maternity homes, to freely assemble and engage in religious practices or speech without government interference. The bill is sponsored by Rep. Tila Hubrecht (R-Dexter).

Editorial | City’s pro-abortion law only strengthens our resolve

The city named in honor of a saint and nicknamed "Rome of the West" is now a so-called "sanctuary" city for the right to choose abortion, the horrific act of killing innocent, unborn babies.

Let that sink in for a moment.

Our proud city, St. Louis ... it's shameful, embarrassing and disgusting.

"This is not what our city should stand for," Archbishop Robert J. Carlson wrote about Board Bill 203.

Missouri legislation seeks to pre-empt city’s ‘abortion sanctuary’ ordinance

Lisa Johnston  |  lisajohnston@archstl.org  |  twitter: @aeternusphoto

Sponsor of House Bill 174, Rep. Tila Hubrecht from Southeast MO, watched as St. Louis City Ward 06 Alderwoman Christine Ingrassia gave testimony opposing the bill. Ingrassia came to the meeting of the House's Children and Families Committee to voice her concern over pregnancy resource centers. 

Missouri legislators considering a bill on free speech rights of alternative-to-abortion agencies turned to discussion on religious liberty and a recent measure passed in St. Louis City, at a hearing this week at the state Capitol.

House Bill 174, sponsored by Rep. Tila Hubrecht (R-Dexter), would protect the rights of alternatives-to-abortion agencies, such as pregnancy resource centers and maternity homes, to freely assemble and engage in religious practices or speech without government interference. The bill was heard Feb. 14 by members of the Children and Families Committee.

Missouri legislators considering a bill on free speech rights of alternative-to-abortion agencies turned to discussion on religious liberty and a recent measure passed in the City of St. Louis. The discussion came at a hearing Feb. 14 at the state Capitol.

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