archbishop allen h. vigneron

Archbishop Vigneron elected next USCCB secretary, Archbishop Naumann elected chair of pro-life activities

Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kan., center, looked on as Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, N.M., chairman of the U.S. bishops' international policy committee, respondedto a reporter's question during a Nov. 13 news conference at the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

BALTIMORE -- Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit will be the next secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, taking office next November.

Bishops voted 96-88 to elect Archbishop Vigneron Nov. 14 during their fall general assembly.

Votes also were cast for a new chairman of the bishops' Committee for Religious Liberty and chairmen-elect for the committees on Communications, Cultural Diversity in the Church, Doctrine, National Collections and Pro-Life Activities.

Detroit's homeless embodies city's challenges

Katrina Robinson and her two sons, David Collins, 11, and Dabion Collins, 7, looked through books at St. Dominic Outreach Center in Detroit Aug. 7. Since May, on the nights when they are unable to crash with family or friends, the family car is the only shelter Robinson and her two young sons have.

WASHINGTON -- After three months, Katrina Robinson and her two young sons are getting tired of roaming Detroit's suburbs to find a safe place to sleep.

Since May, on the nights when they can't crash with family or friends, the family car is the only shelter Robinson and her two young sons have. The 24-hour big box stores, with bright lighting, security cameras and a decent amount of foot traffic that deters robbers from lurking, offer the safest place to bed down for the night.

Helping Detroit with faith and grit

Nearly 70,000 buildings stand vacant in Detroit, once a thriving industrial city that now struggles providing basic services. Residents and political leaders remain uncertain following the city’s bankruptcy filing but they are responding “with a lot of grit,” said Detroit Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron.

WASHINGTON -- The bankruptcy of Detroit does not mean the city is dead, said Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron.

Residents and political leaders certainly are challenged and remain uncertain, the archbishop of Detroit told Catholic News Service.

"I would say people are responding with a lot of grit," he said.

"Stories about the city being on its death bed are wrong."

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