Viewpoints

AMID THE FRAY | Six deadly sins

One of my favorite criticisms of the Church is that it is fixated on sex. "Why is the Church so obsessed with what I do in the bedroom," many people ask with great seriousness.

I find the observation hilarious because I watch TV, read books and go to the movies. And guess what? Our society is unbelievably obsessed with sex. Religion is no longer the opiate of the masses. Sex is.

The pornography business is bigger than the NFL, NBA and baseball combined. It is so omnipresent that children are discovering it before their parents ever get around to having "the talk."

AMID THE FRAY | A Mass confusion

In professional Catholic circles, a tired joke that still makes the rounds goes like this:

Q: What's the difference between a liturgist and a terrorist?

A: You can negotiate with a terrorist.

Most Catholics never use the word "liturgist" in everyday conversation, and may never have even knowingly met a liturgist, but the average Mass-going Catholic can be as opinionated as any liturgist:

The music is too contemporary, too old-fashioned, too boring, too hip. The priest should celebrate with his back to the people. We should all gather around the altar and hold hands.

BRIMMING WITH HOPE | Sharing the good, the true and the beautiful

During July 1-4, I had the honor to be part of the Archdiocese of St. Louis delegation to the national Convocation of Catholic Leaders. It was four days of praying for and thinking about the Church in the 21st century.

We reflected on what missionary discipleship looks like in light of Pope Francis' apostolic exhortation "Evangelii Gaudium" ("The Joy of the Gospel"). There were many excellent presentations, panels and breakout sessions. While difficult to summarize in a single column, I want to share key takeaways from the convocation.

A MORE HUMAN SOCIETY | Who speaks for Charlie Gard?

A seriously ill 11-month-old child in Great Britain has garnered the attention of President Donald Trump and Pope Francis and sparked an international debate.

Charlie Gard is unresponsive and totally dependent due to a severe genetic defect that compromises his brain cells' metabolism. His parents want to sustain his life and transfer him to an American hospital for a highly experimental treatment — one that has benefited children with a similar but far less serious condition.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Listening in the Spirit

In recent times, social conflict has become more pronounced and it's driving much of our human ethos both locally and globally. A glance at the news quickly illustrates the extent of the opposition and division in our world. Ancient quarrels and international divisions linger and find little resolution. At the same time, emerging global struggles aggravate and augment a broken humanity.

TWENTY SOMETHING | History and humility: an old man’s plea to young adults

The old man with the typewriter would like to say to certain people among us: Don't be a blockhead.

David McCullough's bestselling new book, "The American Spirit," takes up a cause he has long championed, lends it added urgency and aims it squarely at young adults.

"We are raising a generation of young Americans who are by and large historically illiterate," McCullough writes.

Syndicate content