Viewpoints

Guest Viewpoint | We aim for sowers of hope to a world sorely in need of it

Pope Francis, in a few meaningful words, can pull together the work of our hands and the yearning of our hearts and minds. In his brief address Feb. 9 to the Congregation of Catholic Education at the Vatican, he affirmed the mission-rich approach to education embraced by Fontbonne University and other Catholic Universities.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Resilience in the Spirit

In our culture, it's fairly common to move from one job or career to the next. The average person is accustomed to reinventing himself or herself to accommodate the demands of an ever-changing world. We know the importance of updating and upgrading our work skills and status. We network and share gifts and talents, especially with those who might ease our transition from one work environment to the next.

FAITHFUL FAN | Holliday may be gone but he leaves a legacy in St. Louis

In a few days, former St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday will report to spring training for his new team, the New York Yankees. Infielder Matt Carpenter will do the same for the St. Louis Cardinals.

The two Matts are forever linked by their love for the children at SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital. Carpenter is taking over Holliday's role as chairman of the Homers for Health Program.

TWENTY SOMETHING | Angels among us: Helping leads to healing

Spend a day in a surgery waiting room and you'll witness a hundred quiet acts of mercy.

Strangers gather for a host of reasons with a common cause: to sit beneath the slowest clock and wait it out. They make calls, utter prayers and flip through magazines, and in their anxiety, they extend morsels of compassion: smiles and small talk, directions to the cafeteria and tips on its offerings. One person shown the way by someone slightly less new; flashes of humanity while loved ones down the hall are put under.

GUEST COLUMNIST | Cell phones and the real presence

It's a scene that's become more commonplace as technology: One or more of the people gathered for a meal is constantly interrupted by his or her phone. Conversation is stilted, light, and in short bursts between phone checks. Clearly, those gathered at the table aren't the complete group. They're not "the happening." The "others" never called or came, and nobody seems to have a very good visit.

AN EDITOR’S LIFE | Church teaching, faith formation and broad appeal guides our coverage

Readers frequently write or call to ask why we didn't cover an event or why we published a story. Often these aren't neutral inquiries — they're frequently complaints about news judgment.

The tone of these messages seems to have changed in recent years. Now, rather than simple inquiries, messages are infused with angst — "disgusted," "disturbed" and "disappointed" frequently appear. But ultimately, readers are simply curious about why certain stories are news worthy and others aren't.

The answer is easy: there is no easy answer.

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