Viewpoints

MAN OF THE HOUSE | At wits’ end: Giving up the struggle for self-sufficiency and turning to God

A certain man carried an unrelenting burden: alcohol addiction on one shoulder, drug addiction on the other. One night, drunk and high, he could bear it no longer. He was, you could say, at his wit's end. Sitting on a couch in his basement, he set down the bottle and the marijuana, picked up a pistol and felt mentally ready to end his suffering.

He didn't consider himself a spiritual man by any means, which is why the next split-second surprised him completely. From somewhere he couldn't explain, these words came to him.

"Please, God," he whispered, "please help me."

FAITH AT HOME | How to honor fathers with love

Beer. Golf. TV. Mowing. Burping. Fishing.

According to greeting cards in the store aisles, this is all that modern fathers care about.

Father's Day is clogged with lowbrow stereotypes. Dad just wants to hog the remote control, crack a few crass jokes and drink a cold one.

He's not nurturing, caring or involved. He's not devoted to his wife, children or grandchildren.

But think about the fathers you know. Chances are they defy such silly typecasting. They're washing dishes and changing diapers. They're sacrificing to pay for college or moving to be near grandkids.

FAITH AND CULTURE | Remembering, renewing and rejoicing in the fire of the Spirit

In our contemporary life, transitioning from one event to another often occurs with ease and little reflection. We enjoy the thrill of the moment without paying attention to every detail. The fervor of a birthday celebration, for example, soon gives way to the excitement over the family graduation or another emerging fiesta. In short, our lives reflect a series of historical, social and political happenings that seem to come and go out of our lives with little pause for thought.

GROWING UP CATHOLIC | Theology of processions

The Feast of Corpus Christi is June 3, when many parishes process with the Blessed Sacrament.

Church processions are serious business. I learned this right about the time I felt like my kneecaps were going to fall off from kneeling and I was going to collapse into a puddle of perspiration under the pitiless June sun. As a Protestant, I'd been used to worship spaces with cushy chairs with cup holders for my coffee. For Catholics, though, prayer is physical.

DEAR FATHER | There is a distinction between sainthood and canonization

A helpful distinction needs to be made here. Being a saint isn't reserved exclusively to those whom the Church has declared such. Rather, a saint is anyone who has made it to heaven and now beholds the presence of God. One need not be declared by the Church to receive this honor: only God needs to declare it. So, yes, it's all together likely that there are saints in heaven who weren't Catholic.

But there remains the question of whether the Church could canonize a non-Catholic individual.

IN LIGHT OF FAITH | The life-changing power of joy

When you're in your 20s and 30s, you often feel invincible — like there's so much time to make mistakes because you'll fix them tomorrow. It's easy to boast that this is the time to do whatever you want.

But then something happens. Maybe you lose your job or your longtime friend stops returning your texts. Or, maybe you learn at age 35 that you have breast cancer — which is what happened to me.

Syndicate content