Nation and World News

Catholic Charities USA gives $2 million for hurricane relief

Workers take a break after clearing debris from a flooded home in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey Sept. 5 in Dickinson, Texas.

SAN ANTONIO — Catholic Charities USA presented a $2 million check Sept. 4 representing donations received to date for immediate emergency assistance for those impacted by Hurricane Harvey and its catastrophic flooding.

One hundred percent of the funds raised will go directly to immediate and long-term recovery efforts.

Catholic Charities USA's Mobile Response Center vehicle, filled with emergency supplies, left Catholic Charities headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia, for Texas and will remain there to assist Catholic Charities agencies with response efforts.

Catholic Charities continues immediate, long-term recovery efforts after Harvey

A worker cleared water from the floor inside the Shrine of the True Cross in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey Sept. 5 in Dickinson, Texas. The shrine, located near the coast, suffered damage to the church and school buildings.

As Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts continue in Texas, and Florida braces for Hurricane Irma, Catholic Charities of St. Louis and Catholic Charities USA continue the work of providing immediate and long-term recovery efforts.

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson has asked parishes in the Archdiocese of St. Louis to hold a special collection for recovery efforts in Texas. The collections were held Sept. 2-3 and 9-10.

Announced end to DACA program is ‘reprehensible,’ U.S. bishops say

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals supporters demonstrated near the White House in Washington Sept. 5. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Sept. 5 that the DACA program is "being rescinded" by President Donald Trump, leaving some 800,000 youth, brought illegally to the U.S. as minors, in peril of deportation and of losing permits that allow them to work.

WASHINGTON — The cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is "reprehensible," the U. S. Confernece of Catholic Bishops stated, and it "causes unnecessary fear for DACA youth and their families."

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Sept. 5 that the DACA program is "being rescinded" by President Donald Trump, leaving some 800,000 youth, brought illegally to the U.S. as minors, in peril of deportation and of losing permits that allow them to work.

Bishops’ Labor Day statement criticizes ‘excessive inequality’

A worker used a grinder on a metal beam Aug. 10 at a construction site in Los Angeles. Labor Day, honoring U.S. workers, is observed Sept. 4 this year.

WASHINGTON — "Excessive inequality" threatens cooperation among all people in society "and the social pact it supports," stated Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., in the U.S. bishops' annual Labor Day statement.

In the message, Bishop Dewane cited the words of Pope Francis, who told factory workers in Genoa, Italy, "The entire social pact is built around work. This is the core of the problem. Because when you do not work, or you work badly, you work little or you work too much, it is democracy that enters into crisis, and the entire social pact."

Canadian Jesuit, indigenous paddlers form bonds to ‘last a lifetime’

Jesuit and indigenous pilgrims arrived by canoe Aug. 15 in Kahnawake, an Indian reserve south of Montreal. It was the group’s final destination after traveling 540 miles, following a route used by 17th-century missionaries, in an effort to promote reconciliation with Canada’s indigenous peoples.

OTTAWA, Ontario — Despite physical exhaustion, storms, rough waters, food shortages and waking up to slip into wet socks some mornings, Jesuit paddlers said a more-than-500-mile canoe pilgrimage fulfilled all their expectations and more.

The group of about 50 paddlers completed a 26-day odyssey along a historic river-route traveled four centuries ago by explorers and Jesuit martyrs, including St. Jean de Brebeuf. They arrived Aug. 15 at a First Nations reserve near Montreal.

Two Philippine prelates criticize country’s war on drugs

People mourned the loss of Leover Miranda, a 39-year-old victim of a drug-related killing, at a funeral Aug. 20 in Manila, Philippines. Manila Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle called the problem of drugs a “humanitarian concern that affects all of us.”

MANILA, Philippines — Two prominent Philippine bishops criticized the government's war on drugs after a week in which more than 80 people were reportedly killed in stepped-up efforts to end drug use.

In a pastoral letter read at Masses Aug. 20, Manila Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle called the problem of drugs a "humanitarian concern that affects all of us."

"The illegal drug problem should not be reduced to a political or criminal issue," he said.

Syndicate content