Nation and World News

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Vetoed bill on reproductive health called 'massive overreach by NARAL'

In letter to Cardinal Sarah, pope clarifies new translation norms

VATICAN CITY — The Vatican is not to "impose" a specific liturgical translation on bishops' conferences, but rather is called to recognize the bishops' authority and expertise in determining the best way to faithfully translate Latin texts into their local languages, Pope Francis wrote in a letter to Cardinal Robert Sarah.

In the letter, released by the Vatican Oct. 22, Pope Francis stated he wanted to correct several points made in a "commentary," which Cardinal Sarah sent him and which was published on several websites in a variety of languages.

Pope urges Christians to think about what they say in the Our Father

VATICAN CITY — To pray the Lord's Prayer and believe what one is reciting takes real courage, Pope Francis said.

One must be bold "to truly believe that God is the father who accompanies me, forgives me, gives me bread, is attentive to everything I ask," Pope Francis said in a filmed conversation about the Our Father.

The Italian bishops' television station, TV2000, was to begin airing a nine-part series Oct. 25 featuring Pope Francis' conversation with Father Marco Pozza, an Italian prison chaplain and theologian. A long trailer for the program was released Oct. 18.

Catholic organizations, groups actively working on Puerto Rico’s recovery

Father Carlos Francis Mendez, pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Las Marias, Puerto Rico, delivered aid with parishioners’ help to a remote area outside the town Oct. 24. It was the first aid residents of the poor area had received at their homes more than one month after Hurricane Maria devastated the island.

QUEBRADILLAS, Puerto Rico — A month after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, Catholic organizations, groups and individuals were still among the most prominent responders to the needs of a suffering people.

Despite early logistical obstacles, as of Oct. 20, the local Caritas chapter had disbursed over $1.1 million in aid to an estimated 50,000 people — including food, clothing, first aid supplies, potable water and sundries. At its San Juan office, hot lunches also were being distributed daily to members of the community.

Health care law: uncertain outcome after multiple diagnoses

WASHINGTON — The Affordable Care Act — on the examination table since President Donald Trump came into office — has been poked, prodded and even pronounced dead while the fight to keep it alive keeps going.

President Trump told Cabinet members Oct. 16: "Obamacare is finished. It's dead. It's gone. ... There is no such thing as Obamacare anymore," but that isn't how health-care reformers, including Catholic leaders, see it, and it isn't the general public's view either, according to a recent poll.

Catholic-Lutheran dialogue is progress, not perfection

As a Lutheran boy growing up in Virginia, Michael Root saw the faith-based fear and loathing that permeated the 1960 presidential election when some non-Catholics worried that the Vatican would run America should John F. Kennedy be elected.

As an ordained Lutheran pastor and professor of Lutheran history and theology, Kirsi Stjerna saw the trepidation some of her students felt when she took them to Mass at St. Peter's in Rome.

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