Local News

Volunteers transform school’s library/learning center

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"You've got religion?"

"This is all history."

"Where do we want poetry?"

"I've got religion."

All the subjects are covered in the new learning center at St. Louis Catholic Academy, which became clear through the conversations volunteers had while moving bookcases and books into the space which will serve as the school library and more.

MO ABLE program meets long-term savings needs of people with disabilities

A new program in Missouri allows people with disabilities to save for long-term disability-related expenses via tax-free savings accounts.

State Treasurer Eric Schmitt announced the launch of the MO ABLE program in April. Similar to the 529 college savings plan, Missourians who contribute to ABLE accounts will be eligible for a tax deduction of up to $8,000, or $16,000 if married and filing jointly.

Parents of children with disabilities now have a resource

Crystal Showers-Maynard played with her son Jace when she got home from work. Jace was born with myelomeningocele, a form of spina bifida in which the spinal cord and spinal canal does not properly close. Throughout her pregnancy Showers-Maynard received help from Birthright’s The Melissa’s Smile Assistance Program.

Thirty two weeks into her pregnancy, Crystal Maynard received worrisome news.

A prenatal care visit revealed that her unborn son, Jace, had myelomeningocele, a form of spina bifida in which the spinal cord and spinal canal do not properly form.

"I Googled about 80 million articles," she recalled after learning the news. "My entire world changed in just one day."

Cardinal Dolan finds cheeseburgers & paradise in Maplewood

After the show started, Cardinal Dolan switched to a St. Louis Cardinals cap. On a break, he sipped a milk shake.

Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York came home July 31 with a loud gathering of friends and family — eventually adding a national audience — while munching on a cheeseburger and a shake.

Sister Antona Ebo feted as example of living the Gospel message

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Come. Listen. Live. Witness.

Those are the words by which Sister Mary Antona Ebo continues to live and those by which she was celebrated at a presentation July 30 at the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park.

Music, poetry and acting, peppered with photos and past video interviews with the Franciscan Sister of Mary and civil rights icon, were woven into a nearly two-hour program to recognize Sister Ebo. She's most famous for her role in the 1965 march in Selma, Ala., for voting rights for blacks, but also known for her groundbreaking ministry as a woman religious and in health care.

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