Local News

Ignatian Spirituality Retreats help homeless find spiritual backing to help them through challenges

Delnita McGhaw was homeless when she attended an Ignatian Spirituality Project retreat, which provides homeless people with hope that leads to long-lasting transformation. “The exercises stimulate your spiritual inner being,” she said. “I didn’t know you could have a moment alone with God.”

Alcohol eventually led Delnita McGhaw to homelessness. She found help through a women's shelter, which referred her to St. Patrick Center for treatment. There, she learned about a spiritual retreat for women.

"I didn't really know what it was," she said. At that time, her only sense of God was found in a bottle of alcohol. Abused by her father as a child, McGhaw said she "had no self-worth, no self-esteem, no nothing. I just had a love for that bottle and that's all."

Bishops consider ways to revitalize appeal of a Catholic education

WASHINGTON — Catholic bishops are looking to "transform" Catholic schools in response to decades of declining enrollment that has forced hundreds of schools to close since 2005.

The effort, said the chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on Catholic Education, encompasses a wide-ranging look at issues facing Catholic schools and a renewed effort to help parents better understand that the spiritual development of a child goes hand in hand with academic achievement.

Local marches show strong pro-life witness

Walkers participated Saturday in a march for life and rally hosted by the middle school ministry at St. Alban Roe School. The crown marched from the school down Missouri Route 109 to Wildwood City Hall for a rally that included an address from Mayor Jim Bowlin.

For about a half-hour on either side of noon Jan. 20, students and parishioners from St. Alban Roe Parish and School bore powerful witness to the pro-life movement.

About 200 people — 30 students in the middle-school youth ministry joined by roughly 170 parishioners of all ages, from babies to seniors — marched on the bike path along Highways 109 and 100, chanting, singing and carrying signs.

Planned Parenthood protest makes concrete the meaning of the March for Life

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Yoi Reyes believes that her son should not have to pay for a crime that was committed by another.

Years ago as a teenager, Reyes was raped by her stepfather in her native Cuba. The first time, at 13, she was forced to have an abortion. The second time, the baby was too far along, and the doctor refused to do the abortion. Her son Pedro, now 27, welcomed his first child into the world on Thanksgiving Day.

These women from St. Louis describe why they are part of the March for Life

Anna Jones

After attending the Generation Life pilgrimage for the first time as a freshman, Anna Jones marched back to St. Louis, determined to start a pro-life club at Kirkwood High School.

At the end of their pilgrimage, Generation Life teens were invited to make a personal commitment to life issues — thus how Pioneers for Life was born.

Effort underway to gain passage of ‘Raise the Age’

The Missouri Catholic Conference is among supporters of state legislation that would require children up to the age of 18 to be prosecuted for criminal offenses in juvenile court unless the child is certified as an adult.

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