Education

‘Beyond Sunday’ campaign already pays benefits

Autumn Zoellner, right, a student at St. Vincent de Paul High School in Perryville, is a recipient of a Beyond Sunday scholarship. She also works at a local retirement center in hope of becoming a physician.

Catholic education runs in Beth Zoellner's family, so it's no surprise that Beth and husband Jason's three children — Autumn, Tyler and Reese — are in St. Vincent de Paul School in Perryville.

As of May 27, Autumn, 16, is a rising junior in the high school, with Tyler, 12, entering seventh grade and Reese, 9, fourth.

Beth Zoellner graduated high school from St. Vincent de Paul in 1997, and her mom and dad, Dianne and Larry Brown, graduated in 1969. Beth's grandmother Rosettia Bohnert only went to school through eighth grade but it was in a Catholic school.

“Pizza for PSR” | St. Justin Martyr and St. Simon students connect with St. Andrew PSR peers

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The cafeteria scene looked like any gathering at Any School USA, just peer boys and girls sitting around a table and either watching video games on smart phones or nibbling on the day's delicacies — meatball sandwiches and chips washed down with soda pops, juices or sports drinks.

In other words, nothing special.

But this was a novel scene, with students from three schools mingling and beingOne, so to speak, enjoying each other's company and fare from an area food truck.

BRIMMING WITH HOPE | Mortarboards and tongues of fire

Kurt Nelson

Last weekend the Church celebrated Pentecost. This feast commemorates the occasion of the Holy Spirit descending on the apostles in the form of tongues of fire — therefore red is the liturgical color for the day. So you can imagine that the seniors participating in Bishop DuBourg High School's Baccalaureate Mass on this year's Feast of Pentecost were an impressive sight at Our Lady of Sorrows Church in their red and white graduation robes.

Student-inventor dissolves environmental problem while adhering to Christian ecology values

Sydney Gralike and her friends found a way to dissolve Styrofoam into glue. Gralike, a 13-year-old Parish School of Religion student at Assumption Parish in south St. Louis County, and her classmate, Christina Yepez, stirred a batch of degenerating Styrofoam.

Sydney Gralike stirred a gooey substance on a piece of Styrofoam. "It's dissolving a little bit," said her assistant, Christina Yepez.

Sydney, a 13-year-old Parish School of Religion student at Assumption Parish in south St. Louis County, is helping to solve one of the world's pressing environmental problems.

Girls are pumped about lessons learned on the run

Lisa Johnston | lisajohnston@archstl.org | twitter: @aeternusphoto

Mia Gordon, a fourth-grader, ran running drills with other girls at St. Ambrose School in a Girls on the Run practice. The school was selected for a special practice with Lisa Stone, women’s basketball coach at St. Louis University, and a few of the SLU women’s basketball players.

Third-grader Maddie Ruggeri and fourth-grader Eliza Kelly had just finished doing jumping jacks, running in place and laps inside the gym and playing a game that kept them moving. They were about to do more activities outside.

As participants in the Girls of the Run St. Louis program at St. Ambrose School in the "Hill" neighborhood of south St. Louis, they didn't want to talk about the fun exercises. Instead, they focused on the life lessons they were learning.

"I like it because girls can be themselves and express their feelings while having fun," Maddi said.

Bennett touts Catholic education, scholarships at Gala

Last year, Cameron Caldwell hurt his shoulder on the day he was to speak at Archbishop Robert J. Carlson's Gala, the major fundraiser for the Today and Tomorrow Educational Foundation.

But the senior from Cardinal Ritter College Preparatory High School came to the event anyway, delaying his emergency room visit until after he had spoken eloquently about what Catholic education has meant to him, how TTEF's generous supporters and scholarships have enabled him to get quality education and open up opportunities for the future.

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