Film unsettles Muslims, Christians; some say it makes them targets

CNS photo | Ammar Awad, Reuters
CAIRO -- As tear-gas bearing police battled Egyptians armed with stones in front of Cairo's U.S. Embassy, Rashad was two neighborhoods away, making sure the few evening costumers respected the line at the Mobinil cellphone company where he works. "Is it all right to defame the Prophet, blessings be upon him?" Rashad, a Muslim, asked a reporter who inquired about the embassy standoff. "No. There are limits to how far people should be allowed to go," he said after a slight pause, in answer to his own question.

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